2021-summertrue1627412200182tlmasonSummer 2021/articles/2021-summerIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-summertlmason1620150385536tlmason1627318891522issue-titlePreparing for the return to campusshort-display-nameSummer 2021alternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonefaculty-success-storiestrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelMore things we'll keep from 2020: InScribe, VoiceThread, and moreMore things we'll keep from 2020: InScribe, VoiceThread, and moreFaculty success stories/articles/2021-summer/faculty-success-storiesIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-summer/faculty-success-storieswittmann1626788575497sjengel1627410776199column_namefeatureshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-summer/leadfeaturelanding_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/leadfeaturelanding_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadfeaturelanding_desktop.jpgSix individuals shown from chest down, sitting on a stone wall, holding various books, notebooks, and computers2059591800600/images/2021-summer/leadfeaturelanding_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/leadfeaturelanding_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadfeaturelanding_tablet.jpgSix individuals shown from chest down, sitting on a stone wall, holding various books, notebooks, and computers983741200400/images/2021-summer/leadfeaturelanding_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/leadfeaturelanding_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadfeaturelanding_mobile.jpgFour individuals shown from chest down, sitting on a stone wall, holding various books, notebooks, and computers79980768512///Right
Faculty success stories
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This spring, we ran our first faculty success stories about tech-driven approaches instructors tried during the pandemic, and hope to keep in the future. Here are the latest installments in the series:

Have a story to share? Email us a short explanation of your tech-driven approach: ReachLT@iu.edu.

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Meghan PorterOn Page/
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How do you manage the sheer volume of email for classes with hundreds of students, who rely on in-person reminders and asking questions in passing?
h2FullOne HalfMeghan Porter, Ph.D., lecturer, inorganic and general chemistry, IU Bloomington

Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry (200 student lecture course)
Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (100 student corresponding lab)
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (upper level lab with 6-12 students)

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How many times have you heard, "Well, this might be a stupid question, but..."? If students were already starting their questions like that, it made Meghan Porter think about how many questions they simply didn't ask at all because they were too self-conscious. That was her driving force in starting to use InScribe Q&A Community, a crowd-sourcing platform that moves questions from one-on-one and small group spaces to community spaces, and it became even more important once everything went online.

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When you're talking about hundreds of students, the emails get overwhelming. Though many have to do with things you've already posted, you still have to reply. Students like InScribe because it's much faster than email, and they can search and get help on their timeline. I like it for providing assistance outside of what I would consider normal hours.

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Simplify communication and promote peer learning in large classes using InScribe
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Student feedback underscores this point:  "I never felt like I had a question that I couldn't get help for, especially with this as an option." "I liked that the professor could endorse answers and answer directly in real time. Usually in person classes you have to wait until the next lecture to ask a question or send an email." "I could see questions that other students asked that I would have never thought of -- I hope that more classes implement it even when we go back to in person."

One student also called out a benefit that Dr. Porter came to see as crucial: "Having an extra place to ask questions and get more information/connection with other students was really helpful in students feeling less isolated." Even in person before the pandemic, Dr. Porter sought to build community in large classes. But, as one of her colleagues pointed out, group chats – her students’ usual communications – are naturally exclusive.

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"Not all 200 people are going to be in that group chat. And if you don't know somebody in the class, you might not get an invitation. So I really try to promote InScribe as a community for everyone, and establish from the beginning that the main goal of this is to build community and help everyone's learning."

In some ways, Porter also finds that it helps students build confidence that they are actually able to help each other, especially with content questions. It's low stakes and anonymous -- they're not answering for a quiz or points, and they don't have to worry about messing up something. However, she definitely makes sure to use the endorse feature, so students know she has seen the answer and thinks it is good. Occasionally, she'll provide a quick clarification, but her posts don't have to be as long or in depth since she is not starting from scratch with her answer.

Anonymous posting, which is optional but highly recommended by Porter, has been key to students being willing to both post and answer each other's questions. Porter notes that even when you allow students to post anonymously, you can still see who they are in case a discussion wasn't respectful or if students have questions specific to her feedback. (She hasn't had issues, but she creates a class contract at the outset to set a tone of respect and trust.)

Tips for other instructors:

  • Welcome: "I create a page that welcomes students to InScribe and explains what we're using it for, why we're using it, and our goals for using it. Then I have a Quick Check in Canvas on what is and what is not appropriate to post on it and how we will be using it in our course."
  • Simplicity: "If you can keep all communication in one platform, that's easier. Because options for setting email preferences were initially limited, I ended up using Canvas announcements for some items. Students can now choose to receive email alerts for moderator announcements, so this fall I'll switch to doing everything in InScribe. It gets them into the habit of checking, and it keeps all communication in one searchable place."
  • Expectations: "Unless it's a question only I can answer, I won't jump in until a student has replied to another student. I don't want it to become just a different way of emailing where they are still waiting for me to respond. I got the idea from Dr. Anne Zhang (Dept. of Psychology and Brain Sciences), and I spell it out in my syllabus so students know what to expect."
  • Organization: "I make a tag for each course topic, for course logistics, and for "Professor Porter says" (in case students are worried about missing something from me). And I have a separate tag for weekly announcements, which include everything we did in a week and what's coming up next. Making them a tagged topic gives students a chance to reply with questions -- and, after each quiz, it gives me a place to go over common misconceptions, so it's all contained. I tag content by exam too, so if they search "Exam 1" then content that comes up."
  • Analytics: InScribe also has the added benefit of built-in analytics for gauging student engagement. After a quiz retake frustratingly full of the same mistakes, Porter posted a reminder, "Don't forget, we post common misconceptions by question for every quiz. On the last one, only 40 of 200 of you looked at it before the retake."

Porter does note that in smaller classes like her six-person upper division class, InScribe doesn't take off in the same way. They already know each other, plus they see her regularly. But for large classes, it's beneficial for streamlining information, getting students out of the confines of email and group chats, and building connections. "I have a topic for whatever students are involved in to build community beyond the classroom, so we get to know each other better and not everything has to be serious. People can post about their clubs, activities, hobbies, interests ... or, you know, lighten things up a bit by sharing pictures of their pets or funny memes."

Implementation Resources

  • Sample syllabus language:
    Communication Expectations
    This term we will be using InScribe (Q&A community) for all class discussion and Q&A. This system is designed to get you the help and/or answers you seek as fast and efficiently and possible from classmates, the AIs, and myself. Rather than emailing questions to the teaching team, we ask you to post your questions to this community.
  • How to use InScribe (for students)
    This resource details the instructor and student practices for Inscribe for Meghan Porter's N331 course. You can easily import this Canvas Page and corresponding Quiz into one of your courses and customize it as you wish.
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With something as specialized as medical imaging technology, how do you provide meaningful feedback and insightful evaluations at a distance?
h2FullOne HalfChristine Rassel, Clinical Assistant Professor of Radiologic Sciences, IU Kokomo

Courses in medical imaging technology (both anatomy and pathology)

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Chris Rassel has always provided feedback at a distance, as she isn't physically present in clinic with the students whose work she is evaluating. That distance means she is constantly on the lookout for ways to create connections and be more collaborative. As even labs moved online during the pandemic, that sense of community became even more important: She didn't want to lose the discussions and interaction that are so central to student learning and skills development.

With VoiceThread, Rassel and her students can create, share, and comment on images, PowerPoint slides, videos, audio files, documents, and PDFs. This approach works well for students with varied learning styles, who prefer to learn from audio or video – and, admittedly, want something more conversational like social media. Over time, they gain a much clearer sense of how imaging should look, and as one student noted, really come to "enjoy looking at other students’ images and involving [everyone] in critiquing online."

Rassel's ultimate goal is to bridge the gap between assessing image quality and improving students' abilities to create high quality images. Most issues come down to things such as are they recognizing image artifacts? What are the technical settings? Where is the focus? How could the images be improved?

Each week, Rassel now has two or three students submit images they've taken, and share anonymously as a VoiceThread so other students can assess those images. She has a rubric set up, requiring students to give a minute or more of voice comments and use the writing tool for additional suggestions. Commenters don't know who submitted the images (so they're more forthright with their critiques), and they can only hear each other's responses after the assignment is due.

Learn how to build from meaningful student introduction videos to image critiques in VoiceThread using the Tech Recipes here.

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I'm using alternative assessments and moving away from the "read this/test that" model to provide more meaningful feedback. Anytime I can go more of an activity route rather than a homework or quiz route, it makes things more interactive, and students are more engaged.

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In addition to following the same rubric she established for her students, particularly labeling with the writing tool and circling noteworthy features, Rassel inserts questions into her (asynchronous) VoiceThread lectures. Students respond, she reacts to their comments, and it ultimately simulates the give-and-take of class discussion. She can also add links to videos and other resources related to the topic at hand.

Rassel, admittedly, would love for students to listen to other students' comments as well, but it's a bit of a catch-22: If they can hear other comments prior to their own, they basically all say the same things. But if they have to make their own comments first, they don't go back and listen to other comments. Her solution has been to draw attention to certain comments during grading, encouraging them to go back and listen to the comments about what they missed.

Tips for other instructors:

  • Post how-to videos for the first week of class: "I have a Getting Started module with all the technologies, with different how-to videos related to them. And I do a walk-through process as well."
  • Include questions in text boxes or the VoiceThread lecture itself, requiring students to leave a response: "Participation is a big part of my students' grades, so I use the questions to prove that they're actually listening to and engaging with the lectures."
  • Have your rubric attached to the assignment before you set the VoiceThread: "If you don't, it won't let you add the rubric after. I've had to start over a few times as a result."
  • Take advantage of VoiceThread classes: "The hardest thing for me was setup, so I had to watch a couple of their how-to videos and make some notes. And I also use that in my course to help students set up their accounts and that kind of thing."

Moving forward, Rassel and colleagues are incorporating CN Post as another core learning technology. Instead of having students write papers, they can use CN Post's social media features to have them engage with other students around issues focused on civic engagement or diversity. Basically, they summarize an article or thought piece, then moderate a class discussion around it based on three thought-provoking, open-ended questions they've devised. The process helps challenge everyone's assumptions and draw out other viewpoints.

Rassel has also started having students work together to develop their own study guide with definitions of terms and related imaging characteristics. Her initial, end-of-semester attempt at the study guide didn't give students enough time, so she plans to use a Google Doc or Pressbook in the future to build something they can work on throughout the semester. In the long run, it could be helpful for them as future professionals too, especially with certain pathologies and diagnoses based on a patient's indications.

"I'm always trying to come up with different things to be more interesting and less daunting. And I'm trying to build experience beyond just, for instance, knowing what the disease pathology is. I want them to think about different age groups and what symptoms a patient might have. By having them do it in a more collaborative way, they pick up on different things and draw those connections."

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JoTLT special issue
h2FullOne HalfMichael Morrone, editor in chief, and Christopher J. Young, executive editor

The Journal of Teaching and Learning with Technology (JoTLT) published a special issue on transitioning teaching to remote and online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Authors of the issue's 41 articles present international perspectives and describe adaptations across a wide variety of disciplines.

Here is a selection of contributions from IU faculty and administrators, along with a short list of others that might be of interest. We've intentionally focused on authors who describe specific changes/strategies that they plan to keep beyond the pandemic.

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Coffee Over Zoom: Teaching Food Studies Over the Internet During a Pandemic
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https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/jotlt/article/view/31566/36101
Clark Barwick, IU Bloomington

Abstract: This essay details the process of transitioning an in-person, undergraduate honors seminar on the global coffee trade to an online course as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the course’s demand for physical proximity, specific challenges emerged involving course design and active learning. This essay considers the problem-solving process and ultimate strategies for remotely teaching, discussing, and experiencing the global coffee trade. Specifically, this essay examines how YouTube and Zoom became important pedagogical tools for reimagining experiential learning and creating meaningful human connections.

Keywords: coffee, coronavirus disease, COVID-19, online teaching, honors seminar, YouTube, Zoom

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Building Student Communities in Spite of the COVID-19 Pandemic
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https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/jotlt/article/view/31410/36107
Viola Ardeni, University of California, Davis
Sarah Dallavalle, University of Chicago
Karolina Serafin, IU Bloomington

Abstract: In times when the humanities at large have suffered reductions in enrollments, the ability to build student communities has been seminal to the survival of many departments. Building student communities for language departments in particular includes planning conversation hours, movie nights, and cultural events aimed at attracting students and raising retention rates. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced departments across the country to modify not only their course formats but also the events offered outside of the regular teaching schedule. In this article, we discuss the shift that the Italian Language Program at IU Bloomington decided to apply to our community-building activities during and after the transition from in-person to an online mode of instruction.

To translate several events planned for the rest of the spring 2020 semester into an online environment, we had to resort to the extensive use of social media, such as Instagram and Facebook. Moreover, it was necessary to find creative ways to completely rethink our outreach efforts while still being relevant. Through a tight collaboration among language instructors, we invented and implemented a series of new activities (such as online bingo and cooking lessons) as well as translated those that were crucial for our program to exist and thrive into an online environment. A karaoke project that was originally intended to be the highlight of the academic year presented the greatest challenge in organization and modification; and yet, with creativity and an open-minded attitude, we managed to successfully finish the project with high student participation.

Keywords: Italian, community building, karaoke, social media, intercultural competence, online instruction

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“Kaikille okei?” Everyone All Right? Shifting Topics and Practices in Language Students’ Chats During the Global COVID-19 Pandemic
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https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/jotlt/article/view/31565/36124
Anu Muhonen, University of Toronto
Elisa Räsänen, IU Bloomington

Abstract: We investigated practices and emerging themes in a Finnish-as-a-foreign-language course virtual chat that took place between two Finnish language classes in two North American universities. Because of the unforeseen COVID-19 outbreak in spring 2020, both universities were suddenly required to move all instruction online to prevent the spread of the virus through physical distancing. We describe and analyze differences in the class chat from before the pandemic to after the transition to remote learning. The main focus is on the COVID-19-related themes and topics the participants shared during the associated lockdown. In addition, we examine what kinds of collaborative activities are created while chatting outside the classroom.

Keywords: chatting, collaboration, foreign language learning, remote learning, blended learning

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Reducing Uncertainty and Podcasting Engagement: An HR Classroom Response to COVID-19
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https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/jotlt/article/view/31412/36131
Jared Law-Penrose, IU Southeast

Abstract: The rapid spread of COVID-19 has radically reshaped the human resource (HR) management policies and practices in organizations of all sizes across the country. Additionally, COVID-19 has had a major impact on the way in which faculty members teach our classes. In this case study, I discuss the way in which I responded to these changes in the courses I teach related to HR. I start with a description of the way in which COVID-19 has impacted not only the course content, but also the pedagogical approach I use to engage students across my classes. I describe my attempt to foster trust despite the uncertainty associated with individual experiences related to COVID-19. I also explain the process for rapidly transitioning to a virtual classroom setting. I describe how I combined courses for instructional purposes and the way in which I pivoted the curriculum for each course. Specifically, I created time-relevant podcasts for students to use across different courses while maintaining distinct learning outcomes for each course. A sample podcast will be provided upon request for those interested.

Keywords: podcast, COVID-19, uncertainty, engagement, non-traditional students

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COVID-19 Transition to Online: Quick! Bring the Fun!
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https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/jotlt/article/view/31107/36135
Cheryl Moore-Beyioku, IU Kokomo

Abstract: The need to quickly transition from face-to-face teaching using engaging, content-based activities to a new, online platform in just two weeks during the COVID-19 pandemic made it necessary to try to migrate familiar activities that the students enjoyed into a virtual classroom. The activity that proved to be the most successful in maintaining a sense of community, engaging students, and reviewing content was playing Quizlet Live while in BreakoutRooms in Zoom.

Keywords: online teaching, gaming, pandemic, student participation, active learning, learner engagement, collaboration, educational technology, Distance Education

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Recreating Cultural Immersion in an Online Environment
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https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/jotlt/article/view/31236/36138
Tatiana Kolovou, IU Bloomington

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic threw a curve ball into everyone’s spring teaching schedule. But for those of us who were a week away from taking their students overseas, it was a game changer. How do you create make-up material for one and a half credit hours while staying true to the course objective of “understanding another culture through immersion and interaction?” My course (Business Culture of Greece) is a three-credit hour course which includes an in-classroom eight week component, followed by a weeklong trip in Athens during spring break. Faculty will discover how to incorporate activities that inform and engage students even when they cannot travel. Ideas shared can apply to domestic travel and are irrelevant to country-specific content.

This submission includes a list of activities faculty can use to replicate in-country experiences designed to meet learning outcomes -- activities such as expert question and answer discussions that normally occur face to face; meetings with local students of the same age to discuss current topics; watching a native language film and debriefing with a film expert; and a final presentation of their course project to their local business client that occurred on Zoom. Preparation discussion questions, student highlight quotes, and lessons learned will be used to help faculty plan for future courses.

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taking-notetrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelHow the teaching centers are helping faculty transition back to in-person teaching and learningNew technology resources developed for faculty returning to campusNew technology resources for faculty/articles/2021-summer/taking-noteIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-summer/taking-notewittmann1626451527355tlmason1627410009456column_nametaking_noteshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-summer/greg_and_randy_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/greg_and_randy_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgreg_and_randy_desktop.jpgGreg Siering and Randy Newbrough, both in red shirts, standing at Indiana University's Sample Gates8436421800599/images/2021-summer/greg_and_randy_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/greg_and_randy_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgreg_and_randy_tablet.jpgGreg Siering and Randy Newbrough, both in red shirts, standing at Indiana University's Sample Gates4032361200400/images/2021-summer/greg_and_randy_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/greg_and_randy_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgreg_and_randy_mobile.jpgGreg Siering and Randy Newbrough, both in red shirts, standing at Indiana University's Sample Gates81187768512///Right
New technology resources for faculty
How the teaching centers are helping faculty transition back to in-person teaching and learning/Crimson
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Randy Newbrough & Greg Siering
h2FullOne HalfAssistant director of the Center for Teaching and Learning (IUPUI)& director of the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning (IU Bloomington)

Reflecting on what we've learned over the past year.

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It's been 15 months since the pandemic forced thousands of IU faculty statewide to quickly transition to teaching online. Similarly, those of us in professional development had to quickly figure out the best ways to provide needed support—as well as determine what other types of resources would be needed in assisting faculty with this transition.

As we look forward to a fall semester that will have our campuses once again filled with students, faculty, and staff, the IU teaching and learning centers have been working with faculty to determine the types of professional development opportunities and resources that will be most beneficial as the university returns to more normal operations. We've also been trying to help with figuring out which tools and techniques to keep from the last couple of semesters of teaching completely in the online environment.

At IUPUI, the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) has worked with their faculty liaisons to determine what specific types of professional development and resources are needed to support faculty as they begin the transition back for the fall 2021 semester. Based on those conversations, the need for resources that faculty could quickly review on specific teaching or technology topics rose to the top of the list. This led the CTL staff to create the Quick Video Guides on Teaching and Technology resource that provides short video segments on a variety of teaching and technology topics. Thank you to all the teaching centers across IU, who contributed content from their webinars and other resources to help develop the guides.

The majority of the Quick Video Guides are in the 5-10 minute range and cover topics like Assessment of Student Learning, Canvas Modules & Assignments, Kaltura, and more. New videos are being added on a regular basis, as this new resource provides a way for faculty to quickly find a topic they are interested in and get the support they need. This resource is available to all faculty on all IU campuses, and the CTL is always open to suggestions on other topics of interest that can be created as a Quick Video Guide.

At IU Bloomington, the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning (CITL) has sponsored faculty panels in STEM disciplines to explore what new teaching approaches instructors plan to carry back to their on-campus classes this fall. That program, along with a broad invitation to instructors to share what they are keeping for fall, has led to a video series that launched mid-June in the CITL blog.

This "What Will You Keep for Fall?" series highlights faculty members in short videos, sharing what challenges they encountered during remote teaching, the approaches they took to solve those problems, and how they see these innovations transitioning back to on-campus teaching in the fall. Topics include online office hours, more frequent low-stakes assessments, and approaches to build class community and sense of belonging. Through this series, the CITL hopes to both support faculty preparations for the fall semester and celebrate the outstanding work our community did over the past year to encourage student success.

Through these resources, all of which are available to faculty on all IU campuses, the teaching centers are working to support our transition back to campus, and to help us all envision how the future of teaching and learning at IU can look even brighter than ever. New resources will also soon be available via the updated Teaching.IU website (currently under development).

Best,
Randy & Greg

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happenings-summer-2021true1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelGet help with preparing for the start of the semester, and for the return to face-to-face teachingChances to exchange ideas and explore techSummer 2021 events/articles/2021-summer/happenings-summer-2021IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-summer/happenings-summer-2021wittmann1626967838186sjengel1627414036610column_namehappeningsshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-summer/happenings_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/happenings_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_desktop.jpgAerial view of Indiana University's Showalter Fountain during a First Thursdays event.2072011800600/images/2021-summer/happenings_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/happenings_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_tablet.jpgAerial view of Indiana University's Showalter Fountain during a First Thursdays event.1001141200400/images/2021-summer/happenings_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/happenings_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_mobile.jpgAerial view of Indiana University's Showalter Fountain during a First Thursdays event.87741768512///Right
Summer 2021 events
Get help with preparing for the start of the semester, and for the return to face-to-face teaching/Crimson
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Getting Started with IT Training
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This webinar series will give you quick introductions to the online courses available at no cost through IU Expand. In 30 to 60 minutes, you'll get examples of what to expect from a course and learn how to enroll.

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  • July 29: Getting started with Adobe Rush
  • August 3: Microsoft Teams at IU: Basic collaboration and project management tools
  • August 5: Getting started with Microsoft Planner
  • August 10: Getting started with inclusive design in documents
  • August 12: Google at IU: File organization and basic collaboration

Explore courses and register online.

Access recordings of previous webinars.

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Creating Engaging Digital Stories with Adobe Spark
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Learn how to create course content, from eye-catching graphics to narrated video.

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This session will cover the basic functions and interface of Adobe Spark, and we'll discuss applications for both your use in creating content for your courses as well as ideas for incorporating Spark digital story assignments into your curriculum. We'll also discuss steps needed to make sure your graphics and videos created in Spark are accessible when using them in other tools like Canvas.

Learn more and register.

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Canvas: Modules & Assignments
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Learn how to use modules to organize your Canvas course.

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Well-organized Canvas modules provide an effective checklist for both instructors and students to ensure all content is being covered. This webinar, offered by the IU campus teaching and learning centers, will provide a basic understanding of how to set up a Canvas course using Modules to organize your assignments, discussions, files, and more.

Learn more and register for the August 5th webinar.

Learn more and register for the August 18th webinar.

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Quickly and Easily Create Video Using Adobe Premiere Rush
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Learn how to use your smartphone, computer, and Premiere Rush to create course videos.

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This session will cover the basics of using Premiere Rush and will provide examples and ideas about how Premiere Rush can be useful in your teaching. We'll also discuss steps needed to make sure videos you create are accessible to all learners. Premiere Rush can also be used to edit other video, such as screen captures or video lectures, and students have access to it, so they can use it for creative projects you might assign.

Learn more and register.

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Designing Effective and Equitable Group Assignments
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Learn about strategies and tools for collaborative projects.

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Successful group projects require thought about group formation, the establishment of group norms, and access to the tools and strategies that groups need to be successful. In this webinar, participants will learn about and share strategies for creating, supporting, and evaluating effective and equitable group assignments. We will also discuss tools that can simplify various aspects of collaborative projects for both students and instructors.

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Making Canvas Work for You: Importing Content from Previous Semesters' Courses
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Learn how to import some or all of your content from a previous course.

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You have your shiny new Canvas courses for fall semester, but you don't want to start from scratch! Learn how make Canvas do the bulk of the work for you. We'll also talk about important things that you need to check and do after importing and before giving students access to the course.

In addition, we'll cover some basic beginning-of-the-semester tasks to get your class started on a welcoming note and help make the rest of the semester easier for both you and your students.

Learn more and register.

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Call for proposals: Advancing Teaching and Learning with Technology (ATLT) Symposium
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Save the date, and submit proposals between now and September 13.

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Proposals are now being accepted for this year’s ATLT Symposium. The Symposium will be held Friday, November 5, 2021 on Zoom. All presentations will be virtual.


There are two presentation formats available:

  • A 15-minute "What Did You Learn" session where presenters share one important thing they learned about teaching and learning with technology during the COVID-19 pandemic that other IU instructors would find helpful or enlightening
  • A 40-minute Concurrent Session where presenters share their innovative work with existing or emerging instructional technologies and their pedagogical applications

Registration will open in August. For more information and to submit a proposal, visit the ATLT website.

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fact-or-fictiontrue1627564893422tlmasonJeannette LehrSupporting information literacy, so students can decipher fact from fiction in a range of contentSupporting information literacyFact or Fiction: Sex-crazed cicadas on psychedelics/articles/2021-summer/fact-or-fictionIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-summer/fact-or-fictionwittmann1626454312330tlmason1627413026063column_namefeatureshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-summer/cicadabanner1_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/cicadabanner1_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofcicadabanner1_desktop.jpga detailed close-up of a 17-year cicada repeated into a pattern against a black background.1567671800600/images/2021-summer/cicadabanner1_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/cicadabanner1_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofcicadabanner1_tablet.jpga detailed close-up of a 17-year cicada repeated into a pattern against black background743491200400/images/2021-summer/cicadabanner1_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/cicadabanner1_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofcicadabanner1_mobile.jpga detailed close-up of a 17-year cicada against black background51294768512///Right
Fact or Fiction: Sex-crazed cicadas on psychedelics
Supporting information literacy, so students can decipher fact from fiction in a range of content/Crimson
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"Fungus full of psychedelic drugs could cause Indiana Brood X cicadas' butts to fall off" (The Indianapolis Star)
"A fungus is pushing cicada sex into hyperdrive and leaving them dismembered" (NPR)

Students need information literacy skills more than ever, when even legitimate news items read like satirical headlines aimed at drawing clicks. The IU Libraries' Information Literacy Online Toolkit is a great starting place for instructors looking to help their students assess potential sources and be better informed. Jane Mason and Meg Meiman of IU Libraries developed the Toolkit in 2018 to help instructors at all IU campuses introduce students to evaluating and analyzing information they find online.

The Toolkit "is designed to start the conversation about information literacy," says Mason. It focuses on important concepts like credibility, reliability, authenticity, and authority. Available on the IU Libraries website, the Toolkit provides instructors with a way to introduce these principles into their courses through modules and video tutorials that integrate seamlessly into Canvas. Faculty can select the content they find most valuable for their students, and import it directly into their Canvas course.

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Start using the Toolkit
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  1. Preview materials in the Toolkit by:
  2. Then you can import, use, and adapt Toolkit for your Canvas courses.
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Adam Smith is a senior lecturer in the Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior at IU and used the Information Literacy Online Toolkit extensively in his Spring 2020 class, Introduction to Animal Behavior. This course, new to Smith, was a general education course with around 75 students, mostly non-majors and freshmen. He said that, as a biology professor, he is used to reading and evaluating scholarly articles. His students, however, have significantly less experience. Smith used several of the modules from the Toolkit to gauge students' ability to find and decipher quality information.

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Smith said that even if professors don't plan on integrating the modules into their Canvas courses, the Toolkit can be helpful in developing class curricula. "Even just browsing the toolkit as a professor and looking at the materials that are there helped me think about the things that students might not know. Everyone should review it to see what issues freshmen might have when developing any exercise that involves students finding information."

Students have reported other valuable new skills beyond determining credible information: sifting through databases to find information; combining credible resources and blending them into an argument; and the importance of using information in a credible way.

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I learned the importance of fully explaining why I chose each source and the reasoning behind why the information is valuable to my research. I always assumed it was just the content of the source that was most important, but this [Toolkit] module helped me realize that the reasons behind my desire for that information have the potential to add another layer to my analysis.

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Students need to have a baseline of information literacy as they move through college, said Smith, and the Toolkit was successful at ensuring that in his course. Smith is grateful for the Toolkit and the librarian support he received through the IU Bloomington Libraries Information Literacy Grant program, which he learned about through the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning at IU Bloomington. The program provides a stipend and pairs an instructor with a librarian who can help them use the Toolkit, develop exercises, and implement the modules in the most useful and beneficial way possible.

IU Bloomington Libraries plans to restart the Information Literacy Grant program in spring 2022. The announcement typically goes out the semester before the grant period. Interested instructors should look for a call for applications this fall. They can also express their interest in advance of the callout through libinstr@iu.edu or their preferred librarian. The grants are awarded to instructor/librarian teams, so interested professors will need to team up with a librarian.

Ultimately, if your students want to find out if cicadas' butts are really falling off, and decipher other cryptic online information, this Toolkit will help them develop the critical thinking skills to decipher fact from fiction. And those are skills everyone needs these days.

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atac-accessible-coursestrue1627571068579tlmasonSarah EngelFour examples of how ATAC has helped faculty create more accessible courses for all studentsTaking a proactive approach to course design, with guidance from the Assistive Technology & Accessibility CentersCreating more accessible courses/articles/2021-summer/atac-accessible-coursesIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-summer/atac-accessible-courseswittmann1626969037231tlmason1627571054863column_namefood_for_thoughtshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-summer/fft_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/fft_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffft_desktop.jpgTwo middle-aged women looking at a computer screen; one woman is pointing and explaining something.1123101800600/images/2021-summer/fft_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/fft_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffft_tablet.jpgTwo middle-aged women looking at a computer screen; one woman is pointing and explaining something.552751200400/images/2021-summer/fft_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/fft_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffft_mobile.jpgTwo middle-aged women looking at a computer screen; one woman is pointing and explaining something.49213768512///Left
Creating more accessible courses
Four examples of how ATAC has helped faculty create more accessible courses for all students/Crimson
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The UITS Assistive Technology and Accessibility Centers (ATAC) help the IU community use technology to provide equal access and an inclusive environment. When students with disabilities request an accommodation, ATAC specialists are available to advise instructors on their course content, alternative media formats, and other potential learning tools like software and hardware.

Some instructors have taken a proactive approach and asked ATAC to consult on their course design from the outset to create more accessible courses for all their students, not solely those who request accommodations. Below ATAC consultants and collaborators share four examples of how these consultations work, along with resources you might find useful in your own courses.

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Knowing that all students are able to complete a laboratory experience is very important to me. I want to make sure that all students, regardless of their learning needs, are able to enroll in my course.

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Want to check how accessible your content is?
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Turn on Ally in your Canvas course

Ally, a Canvas plug-in powered by Blackboard, will help instructors ensure their content is more accessible for all students. Once activated, Ally will generate alternative formats for students to download, give instructors an accessibility score for their content, and provide tips on improving the accessibility of the Canvas course.

Beginning August 1, instructors can submit a request to have Ally turned on for their Canvas course using this opt-in form. To learn more about how Ally can help make course content more accessible, check out the Ally Instructor Quick-start guide and Ally Student Guide.

Questions? Contact the Assistive Technology and Accessibility Centers at atac@iu.edu or (812) 856-4112.

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Example 1: Taking a hands-on approach to making course content accessible
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  • Instructor: Terri Hardy, adjunct instructor of sociology at IU East
  • Consultant: John Ault, accessibility analyst at ATAC
  • Focus: PowerPoints, Word docs, video, and Canvas pages

Read John Ault's reflection

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Example 2: Making an accessible math course one step at a time
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  • Instructor: Deb Jaworski, lecturer in mathematics at IU Kokomo
  • Consultant: Destin Hubble, accessibility analyst at ATAC
  • Focus: Presenting math in Canvas, assessments, and videos

Read Destin Hubble's reflection

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Example 3: Establishing accessibility as a priority at the departmental level
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  • Departmental leads: Janna Hitzeman-Crampton, learning technology specialist, and Heather Waye Arle, instructional designer, Office of eSocial Work Education and Practice
  • Consultant: Sarah Herpst, accessibility analyst at ATAC
  • Focus: Building accessible courses from the start

Read Sarah Herpst's reflection

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Example 4: Developing accessible online content, activities, and lab exercises
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  • Instructor: Gina Londino-Smolar, Senior Lecturer, Forensic & Investigative Sciences; Faculty Fellow, Teaching and Learning Technologies
  • eLearning Design and Services (eDS) collaborators: Carrie Hansel, Maggie Ricci, and Caitlin Malone
  • ATAC collaborators: Chris Goodbeer, Destin Hubble, and Michael Mace
  • Focus: Everything from 3D renderings to 360-degree tours to tactile graphics

Read Carrie Hansel's reflection

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More resources
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Want to learn more about creating accessible content? For starters, be sure to check out 7 core practices that benefit all students. And for guidance on a range of content types, from instructional materials to social media, visit Accessibility.IU.

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how-to-techtrue1627564893422tlmasonAdam MakslEasier meeting scheduling through Microsoft Bookings and FindTime, from a professor's perspectiveScheduling made easy with Microsoft Bookings and FindTimeManage meetings more efficiently/articles/2021-summer/how-to-techIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-summer/how-to-techwittmann1626453403163sjengel1627414320106column_namehow_to_techshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-summer/scheduling_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/scheduling_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofscheduling_desktop.jpgView over the shoulder of a woman, pencil in her left hand, typing with her right hand, and a calendar on the computer screen1176291800600/images/2021-summer/scheduling_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/scheduling_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofscheduling_tablet.jpgView over the shoulder of a woman, pencil in her left hand, typing with her right hand, and a calendar on the computer screen634641200400/images/2021-summer/scheduling_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/scheduling_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofscheduling_mobile.jpgView over the shoulder of a woman, pencil in her left hand, typing with her right hand, and a calendar on the computer screen59319768512///Left
Manage meetings more efficiently
Easier meeting scheduling through Microsoft Bookings and FindTime, from a professor's perspective/Crimson
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h2FullOne HalfAssociate Professor of Journalism & Media, IU SoutheastFaculty Fellow, eLearning Design & Services, UITS Learning Technologies

From a professor's perspective: Stop spending so much time trying to find time.

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It can be tiring sending emails back and forth with students or colleagues trying to find a mutually agreeable meeting time. When people ask me to let them know when I'm available for a meeting, the info I send them is often quickly out of date by the time they send the meeting invite. And though I have scheduled office hours for students, most student meetings occur outside of those set hours. I needed an easier way to plan meetings.

With the university's migration of all faculty and staff email to Exchange Online last spring, two tools are available now that solve my problems and allow me to more efficiently and effectively manage meetings: Microsoft Bookings and FindTime.

These tools are especially useful if you use Outlook at IU to manage your calendar (as I do), though they can be used even if you do not.

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Create a self-service meeting sign up form using Microsoft Bookings
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With Microsoft Bookings, you can create a self-service sign-up page where students or others can select time slots for meetings -- and when a meeting is made through Bookings, it is added automatically to your Outlook calendar. Unlike the Scheduler tool in Canvas, Bookings syncs with your Outlook calendar, so that times when you're busy won't be presented as options to those using the Bookings sign-up page.

In Bookings, you can specify certain times you want people to be able to book, and you can set the available durations of those meetings. You can also set it up with required lead time, preventing those using Bookings from setting up a last-minute appointment with you.

You might have used the Outlook Scheduling Assistant to see people's free/busy times when inviting other faculty and staff to meetings. But that only works for those who can use Exchange Online at IU (including faculty, staff and a few other groups). So, Bookings can be especially useful to provide a window into your availability for those who cannot use Exchange Online at IU, such as most students or those external to the university.

Bookings was made for businesses, so some of the settings might seem a little awkward in an academic environment when first setting up a booking calendar. Follow the instructions in this IU Knowledge Base article to learn more about Bookings and how it can be useful to faculty work at IU.

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Send out meeting polls using Microsoft FindTime
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We're all used to filling out meeting polls. Though some use third-party meeting polls, at IU, we now have an easy-to-use tool from Microsoft that integrates with our Outlook calendars—Microsoft FindTime.

It functions like other meeting poll services, but with some additional features because of its native integration with Outlook calendars: When you're choosing date/time options to present in the meeting poll, FindTime will suggest times when you and other IU Outlook calendar users are available.

To use FindTime, you will first need to install it as an Add-In. Follow these instructions from Microsoft on how to do so. You can add it to Outlook for the web or add it to Outlook on your desktop.

You can create a new meeting poll from new email messages by clicking on the "New Meeting Poll" button when writing a message. You'll also see a "Reply with Meeting Poll" button when viewing messages, which will create a reply-all message with a link to a new meeting poll.

To access FindTime when using Outlook for the web, click on the three dots underneath the text formatting toolbar.

Setting up the poll is pretty intuitive, but referencing these instructions from Microsoft might help as you create your first meeting poll using FindTime. Once the poll is created, there will be a link in your email for recipients to click and vote for their preferred options.

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on-the-lighter-side-adobetrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelStudents compete for an Adobe Stock campaign to showcase their work at IUIU advertising students compete for an Adobe Stock campaign to showcase their workAnd the winner is.../articles/2021-summer/on-the-lighter-side-adobeIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-summer/on-the-lighter-side-adobewittmann1627061295134tlmason1627409857026column_namelighter_sideshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-summer/light_adobe_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/light_adobe_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflight_adobe_desktop.jpgSample of student-designed flyer using Adobe Stock4247771800600/images/2021-summer/light_adobe_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/light_adobe_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflight_adobe_tablet.jpgSample of student-designed flyer using Adobe Stock2263501200400/images/2021-summer/light_adobe_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/light_adobe_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflight_adobe_mobile.jpgSample of student-designed flyer using Adobe Stock207989768512///Left
And the winner is...
IU advertising students compete for an Adobe Stock campaign to showcase their work/Crimson
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This spring, advertising students in Bill Schwab's portfolio workshop competed for an Adobe Stock campaign to showcase their work on IU campuses across the state. (If you haven't heard, IU faculty, students and staff now have access to Adobe Stock, including more than 200 million photos, graphics, and illustrations.)

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The plan was for Adobe to choose one campaign, but both teams ultimately won out in the end: The judges found it impossible to choose between them. This fall, IU will feature the students' work across a range of communication channels to raise awareness about Adobe at IU. In the meantime, this video highlights the competition and the approaches the two teams took.

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Adobe has been a long-term partner with Indiana University and along the way we've always looked for new and important and unique ways that we can bring these tools to our students. As of November of 2020 Indiana University is a Creative Campus Pro Campus. What that did is that added Adobe Stock to the contract for all faculty, staff, and students. I was looking for a project that was meaty and interesting and compelling that my students could dive into so voila there we are the wonderful Adobe Stock project came to be. Good afternoon. Welcome to our final presentation on how to be exceptional with Adobe Stock at Indiana University. I think Indiana is probably the most innovative school that we do work with. They're always trying to get faculty and students involved. There's a bit more of an added incentive when they feel like they have people on the other end who are actually looking at their work, evaluating the work, giving them responses, um, that goes beyond the classroom. I love to see how excited they are about this. We thought that the best way to advertise to other students would be to focus on how Adobe, specifically Adobe Stock, makes you exceptional and helps you figure out how you can stand out. We took an approach where we tried to find, like, a key insight as to what do all these students relate to? [video clip: presenter speaking: “This one goes from an image being pixelated to [inaudible] beautiful Adobe Stock image at full resolution.”] and I think that's definitely pushed our campaign forward. [video clip: presenter speaking: “…and then the next one, we took the concept of um you know like a picture's worth a thousand words so we have a long description, transitions to the actual picture of the ocean.”] We were completely blown away um at the student work, um, the the tick-tock videos, the social media ads, the billboards, the artwork, the signage, what they were able to do with stock was incredible. What astounded me about this partnership with the media school and their students was the creative, unique ways that the students provided us with how to build a campaign for students the campaign was so creative and so different and unique and it extended our thoughts beyond what we normally do for promotions of of any type of campaign. What I’d really like the students to take away from this is is a sense of that they've had an authentic experience. They've got some sense of what it actually feels like to be an advertising professional versus a professional college student. This is probably the first time that in an advertising class at least for me that we've had a lot of direction from the client. It's nice to have some guidelines and it's nice to make a client happy. You don't really know what the advertising industry is going to be like when you actually walk into it so having this real experience, getting to work with Adobe and really having this team where you make this great campaign has given me the chance to see what it's going to be like in my future. It's just been incredible the work that the students have done. Just just innovation. I can't wait to see when we create the future. They were able to participate and get feedback from the leading professionals in the field on a variety of topics around social media, marketing, and and they actually were able to take that feedback and make their projects even stronger. That's the type of real world connections we want to create for our students at Indiana University.That's what I hope that they feel like they've achieved in this course, that they're ready, that they realize what they realize they have acquired some skills, and they have a sense of what they have ahead of them, and they feel like they have the confidence now to achieve those next set of goals.

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Keep an eye out for the students’ work, coming to IU communication channels this fall. And be sure to check out Adobe Stock in the meantime!

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in-case-you-missed-ittrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelRecent news about teaching and learning with tech, plus a new accessibility toolRecent news about teaching and learning with technologyIn Case You Missed It/articles/2021-summer/in-case-you-missed-itIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-summer/in-case-you-missed-itwittmann1626969316140tlmason1627409694606column_nameicymishort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-summer/icymi_missedtrain_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/icymi_missedtrain_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_missedtrain_desktop.jpgman with backpack running on a train platform after a moving train965371800600/images/2021-summer/icymi_missedtrain_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/icymi_missedtrain_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_missedtrain_tablet.jpgman with backpack running on a train platform after a moving train538971200400/images/2021-summer/icymi_missedtrain_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-summer/icymi_missedtrain_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_missedtrain_mobile.jpgman with backpack running on a train platform after a moving train47070768512///Left
In Case You Missed It
Recent news about teaching and learning with tech, plus a new accessibility tool/Crimson
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Want to know how accessible your course is? Turn on Ally.
Ally, a Canvas plug-in powered by Blackboard, will help instructors ensure their content is more accessible. Once activated, Ally will generate alternative formats, and provide an accessibility score along with tips on improving.

360 degrees of summer fun
IU Kokomo's Cherie Dodd worked with DEPI's Todd Kirk and Jeannette Lehr to create an in depth look at 360 degree cameras and their potential uses in teaching. All workshop content is now available via a self-enroll Canvas course.

The Story of My Life in Stories
Acting Associate VP of Learning Technologies Julie Johnston and Google Design experts judged IU's first exclusive Adobe Creative Jam, naming Kelley's Spandita Sahoo the winner for The Story of My Life in Stories.

Mosaic releases five-year report highlighting impacts since October 2015
Originally launched to support faculty teaching in active learning classrooms, the Mosaic Initiative has successfully extended this support through the Fellows program, leading research, and international recognition.

IUPUI Collaboration Theatre wins European honors for best classroom space
For the second year in a row, IU has earned international recognition for its innovative use of technology in learning spaces. Inspired by classical amphitheater design, the Collaboration Theatre fosters collaboration and conversation.

LT's help with rapid online transition featured in EDUCAUSE 2021 Horizons Report
"Among the finest examples of these [portals/hubs] was Indiana University's faculty-facing Keep Teaching and its companion student-facing Keep Learning…, [whose] structure and content were borrowed by dozens of colleges and universities across the US and abroad."

IU names new associate vice president for Learning Technologies
Jay Gladden will join the Office of the Vice President for IT after serving in academic leadership roles at IUPUI.

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IU-specific tech training to help you get started
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Getting Started with IT Training webinars give you a quick introduction to online courses available at no cost through IU Expand. In just 30–90 minutes you'll see examples of what to expect from the course and learn how to enroll.

These webinars include introductions to productivity tools—like spreadsheets and word processing—as well as creating media using the Adobe Creative Cloud. Find a current schedule in Happenings, or check out recordings of previous webinars.

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2021-springtrue1617131827965tlmasonSpring 2021/articles/2021-springIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-springtlmason1614173813707tlmason1617115652602issue-titleOnline teaching blossomsshort-display-nameSpring 2021alternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonelead-feature-things-to-keeptrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelThings we'll keep from 2020: Top Hat, OneNote, Virtual Reality, TeamsThings we'll keep from 2020: Top Hat, OneNote, Virtual Reality, TeamsFaculty success stories/articles/2021-spring/lead-feature-things-to-keepIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/lead-feature-things-to-keepwittmann1616433897939sjengel1617156214181column_namefeatureshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadfeature_underwater_desktop.jpgJardin du Luxembourg, Paris, France14135631800600/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadfeature_underwater_tablet.jpgJardin du Luxembourg, Paris, France6964561200400/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadfeature_underwater_mobile.jpgJardin du Luxembourg, Paris, France555631768512///Right
Faculty success stories
Things we'll keep from 2020: Top Hat, OneNote, Virtual Reality, Teams/Crimson
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This fall, we put out a call asking faculty to tell us about new tech-driven approaches they tried in 2020 and want to keep, whether their future classes end up being online, in person, or a hybrid. Basically, these are success stories that came out of having to change their courses and/or teaching styles due to the pandemic, which ultimately led to some unexpected and revelatory results. Below are the first three stories, in what we hope will become an ongoing series.

Have a story to share? Email us a short explanation of your tech-driven approach: .

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How do you assess student engagement when they keep their cameras off?
h2FullOne HalfApu Kapadia, associate professor of computer science, IU Bloomington

Undergraduate network security course (juniors and seniors in computer science and informatics)

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Apu Kapadia's long-term goal is to make his classes more interactive and active learning oriented. Before everything moved online due to the pandemic, most of his instruction was on the classroom whiteboard. He also used a lot of group discussions, having students report back and write on the board, and he had started using Top Hat to improve in-class interaction and better gauge student learning. To informally assess how students were doing, he would read the room: Based on facial expressions and eye contact, have I lost them?

Online, synchronous classes on Zoom led him to revisit Top Hat as a teaching tool. By the third week or so, none of his students had their cameras on, and it was like talking into a void. Top Hat made for a more dynamic learning environment—Kapadia could quickly assess whether to spend more or less time on a topic by taking advantage of Top Hat functionality like point-and-click diagrams, questions, and heat maps that illustrate confusion and understanding.

Learn how to do this using the Tech Recipe: Classroom Assessment Techniques with Top Hat and Zoom.

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I could teach as I always did, and every few minutes I could see where the class was. And instead of students maybe tuning out on the other end, or doing other things, they had to keep answering questions and clicking on things. So it, in a way, forced students to be engaged. I mean they all, in theory, want to be engaged. But it's just tough over video. I've watched my own kids trying to learn online and there are just so many other distractions.

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Kapadia is quick to note that Top Hat is not a magic tool. However, it does allow him to do more quick assessments and address points of confusion. He can glance at student posts in real time, make notes on interesting topics that come up, and quickly touch on two or three running themes. And, once you know how to use the platform, Kapadia thinks it's fairly quick to translate what you might have previously put on a PowerPoint slide into a more engaging activity.

Over time, Kapadia has refined these activities, thinking carefully about what he wants students to get out of each one and what might tell him whether they understood it or not. One thing he realized—possibly a bit late, as it came out in his evaluations—was that the way he was using Zoom breakout groups was neither fun nor effective as a replacement for in-class group activities. The majority of students weren't actually collaborating. One student complained about "being stuck in a group of mic shy people" and suggested helpful alternatives such as a more structured group discussion or assigning more stable groups. And, unlike with previous in-person classes, students were unmotivated to do a video-based asynchronous review.

But those were minor points compared to the overwhelmingly positive feedback he received from students. As one undergraduate put it, "He was very helpful and class time almost felt one–on–one even though there were 40 of us." Another student built on this sentiment, saying "I liked that class time was very flexible and the instructor took time to cover the curriculum as well as take questions about previous concepts."

Tips for other instructors:

  • Create a clear Canvas folder structure (week one, with lecture and homework folders; week two, with lecture and homework folders; etc.)
  • Take advantage of Canvas modules functionality, so it's obvious what students need to do (for Kapadia's classes, each module focuses on a key topic, with 10 to 15 minutes of practice to improve understanding)
  • Set up an appointment to go over the basics with an expert (either at your teaching center or, if possible, one who works for the vendor)—there are some technical aspects where it's just better if someone just shows you how to do these things right
  • Ask students to identify what CITL calls the "the muddiest point," meaning the point that's most confusing to them, at the end of a lecture so you can address it next time
    • Or, in a similar vein, have students post a response to discussion and vote for the Big Three (out of all the responses) they'd like to spend more time on—then focus your energy on shared issues that rise to the top

One of the students actually commented to me in office hours that you're using Canvas much more effectively than many of my other classes, and I think it's because of seeing my kids struggle with Canvas and trying to think about how to improve the experience for students.

The other technologies he found indispensable were the iPad and Apple Pencil he convinced his department to buy for online teaching. He was able to screen share directly from the iPad, using OneNote to mimic the whiteboard and teach much like he did in the classroom. In fact, Kapadia now feels like he could teach from anywhere using his new online setup. And he's committed to remote office hours with his iPad for drawing and explaining things.

Learn how to do this using the Tech Recipe: Drawing during Zoom sessions.

While he'll carry forward much of what he's done in the online classroom, Kapadia does feel like one thing was lacking: "I feel like I missed out on the personal connection with the students. That's something I'll work on next time, maybe having everyone come to office hours two or three times in the semester, so I at least get to know some of them on a one-on-one basis." Even without that, his student evaluations praised him for being "kind, understanding, and technologically informed," noting that he clearly had their best interests in mind.

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How can a tourism class still be impactful when you can't travel?
h2FullOne HalfHeather Kennedy-Eden, assistant professor of hospitality and tourism, IU Kokomo

100-level intro to tourism class (in person, but with some students online due to quarantine)

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Heather Kennedy-Eden is always looking for ways to bring active and experiential learning into the classroom. Before the pandemic, she devised group activities and field trips to experience tourism, recognizing the importance of going and doing something that engaged all of the students' senses. Her measure of success was fairly straightforward: Was it a positive, memorable experience? (She allows that even less-than-ideal trips can make for excellent educational and bonding experiences—they learn as much from a bad tour as from a good one because it shows them what not to do!)

While she was able to continue teaching in person, with her students spread out in an auditorium, they were no longer able to get close together. And going somewhere was out of the question. However, thanks to funding from the KEY (Kokomo Experience and You) program—which normally would have supported class trips—Kennedy-Eden was able to try out a new idea. She ordered cardboard VR glasses for everyone, essentially spending $6/each for her students to travel the world.

Ultimately, her students were able to do something they never could have done previously. They took several tours in a single day: one indoor tour of Buckingham Palace, one outdoor tour of Paris including the Eiffel Tower, an aquatic tour of the underwater national park, and a once-in-a-lifetime tour of an Egyptian pyramid. With their cellphones and VR goggles (or laptops and Zoom for those who participated online), they bonded through these totally epic experiences. Even students who had been to some of these places in person were amazed at how real it felt.

Learn how to do this using the Tech Recipe: Using VR in the classroom.

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It really just opens up the world to them so that they can realize there are other things out there that are different. And I'm not saying they're better or worse, but they're different and they're fun to experience. And VR gives you the richness of the experience too.

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There were some interesting things that happened with each tour:

With the Buckingham Palace one, a student who had been there said, oh my gosh, this brings back so many memories that I had forgotten about because I hadn't been there in so long.

I had another student who got emotional on the Paris one because she had gone on a big trip to Paris and taken a similar tour. She said it just brought back so many good memories.

And the underwater tour was great because one student has a medical issue where she can't scuba dive, but she said I can do this and get up close to things I normally wouldn't like baby turtles.

A student's grandmother had been to the pyramids and seen the hieroglyphs. And he said, I know I'm standing in the same place because those are the same hieroglyphs I've seen all my life on her wall. I've always wanted to do this, and now I feel like I have.

It's not 100% the same, but it's about 70% the same. And most of my students want to go back in person someday. I think it pushes them a little bit to go out and experience life. It takes away some of the fear of getting out of their comfort zone.

Tips for other instructors:

  • Do your research and see what's out there in your area by searching for 360-degree tours on YouTube and Google Expeditions.
  • Try it yourself—you need to be comfortable enough that you can help them out if necessary (remember that students learn just as much from experiences that don't go to plan).
  • Find how-to videos and instructions on how to put together the VR goggles ahead of time, and post them in Canvas with direct links to the tours.

Kennedy-Eden has found that virtual reality tours are available for almost any topic including STEM education, which yields options like a tour of what a cell does or a tour of a heart beating, or history and literature, where students could tour ancient ruins or authors' childhood homes. And she had a wide age range of people—from her students, to the media and marketing person who visited the class, to the Vice Chancellor—on both Apple and Android devices, and they all got the VR glasses to work without difficulty for the tours.

Besides, for her, the outcome is more than worth the effort of learning to do something new: "When students have memorable experiences like this with friends and classmates, they become our ambassadors. They feel more connected to each other and to the larger world."

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How do you maintain active learning and community building when things move online?
h2FullOne HalfRob Elliott, senior lecturer of computer and information technology, IUPUI

100-level introductory programming course & 400-level course with final, collaborative agile development project

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Rob Elliott actively encourages what he calls "controlled chaos (hopefully controlled!)" in his classes. For him, the worst thing would be for him to stand and talk at his students for 75 minutes. Before the pandemic, most of his instruction featured very hands-on, whiteboard-intensive active learning. Classes also involved a lot of physical collaboration: five minutes group work, back together as a class, and so on. Through this highly interactive environment, Elliott wanted his students to grow increasingly comfortable asking questions and figuring things out together.

When classes moved online, he focused on continuing the community feel—particularly in the 100-level course, which was the bigger challenge. While they were already using an open source textbook and online coding platform (Codio), they also needed to get the hang of using meeting, messaging, and collaborative software. In the 400-level course, Elliott proceeded with final group projects but gave extra time, reduced reporting, and introduced a range of collaborative software tools (like Planner and Trello for project management) and communication options that were not email.

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If this pandemic had happened six months later, the students were going to have to transition from working in an office to working at home, and still working with all their teammates and collaborating and sharing documents. So we turned it into a teachable moment.

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Elliott used the extended spring break to develop resources that showed his students how to use the new software tools, although he didn't mandate which tools they chose for group work (just that they needed something to collaborate and communicate). However, he did create a Microsoft Team for each course, as a way for students to post questions and send him direct messages. Along with that, he added Teams channels for interacting with peers.

Learn how to do this using a series of Tech Recipes that build from setting up a Team to supporting group work.

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While Elliott was able to continue using his Kaltura video library to cover certain course material, expanding on that required a digital whiteboard with persistent notes. As a self-described "scribbler," he needed something shareable during class Zoom sessions that he could re-open later to provide clarification as needed. OneNote, which he hadn't used previously, worked really well with a class notebook in Teams. Elliott could just pull out his iPad and Apple Pencil, and draw much like he had before.

Learn how to do this using the Tech Recipe: Sharing lecture materials.

He gauged success in the online space slightly differently as well: Are they communicating in Teams channels and sending direct messages? Is this successfully fostering collaboration like we had in the classroom? Are they asking each other questions on the discussion board instead of direct messaging me? Ultimately, it wasn't so much a technical challenge as it was a change in the style of communication.

We don't go to college to learn all the things we'll need to do in our jobs and careers. A large part of it is learning how to figure things out. And part of that is asking really good questions and not being ashamed to ask them. I can make things really accessible, but there's still a definite need for me to teach them to get out there.

Basically, Elliott is trying to nudge students toward being comfortable posting questions more publicly, and also toward asking better questions. Even when they prefer to work things out directly with him, they need to tell him what they tried, which error message they got when it didn't work, and some specifics from their source code. Taking the time to explain the available tools was also really helpful, but now he takes things a step further and creates group documents that are already shared with everybody and ready to go (which again saves time in the long run).

Tips for other instructors:

  • Have no fear. Try something. You don't always have to be perfect.
  • Always think about the student experience. Reduce barriers and try to meet them halfway even if it means pushing your comfort zone a bit.
  • Create on-demand office hours using a calendaring tool (e.g., Microsoft Bookings) that lets you note your availability so students can schedule a meeting with you
  • Having a tablet or Chromebook that connects with Zoom to show what's going on is huge—and capturing it means you can revisit as needed.

Elliott's students especially liked that he routinely took the time to check in on them, and tried to adjust expectations in light of some of them working 50 to 60 hours a week at grocery stores and delivery services:

"He knew when we were mentally taxed out, and the little things of being able to do an assignment during class as a group instead were much appreciated."

"Although this class had an online section before, he used different tools like OneNote, recorded videos, LucidChart, etc. to keep everyone engaged and provide an environment that promotes learning compared to just putting a PowerPoint up."

"The use of the class notebook was really helpful to follow along, and the videos in Kaltura media gallery were concise and informative which made going over the material very easy. Another little thing I liked was that each assignment link was a Google Docs file [that] opened in-browser."

At the end of these spring courses, Elliott also surveyed his students in an attempt to identify the tools they like best for particular tasks. Here are his initial findings listed in order of student preference:

  • Meeting software: Discord, Zoom, Teams
  • Messaging software: Discord, Slack, Teams
  • Collaboration software: GitHub, Google Drive

He hopes to publish a more detailed look at these findings in the near future. (We'll report back when he does!) Note that email didn't make the cut, and students prefer solutions that work on mobile devices. Elliott also recommends reserving Zoom breakout rooms for real-time, problem-solving situations when students want to discuss issues they are having.

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taking-notetrue1627564893422tlmasonJustin ZemlyakTeaching and engaging students through multiple meansTeaching and engaging students through multiple meansRemoving barriers to student success/articles/2021-spring/taking-noteIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/taking-notewittmann1617036134537sjengel1617156585727column_nametaking_noteshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofjz_banner_desktop.jpgJustin Zemlyak, Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies1057361800600/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofjz_banner_tablet.jpgJustin Zemlyak, Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies562921200400/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofjz_banner_mobile.jpgJustin Zemlyak, Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies54571768512///Right
Removing barriers to student success
Teaching and engaging students through multiple means/Crimson
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h2FullOne HalfDirector of Teaching and Learning TechnologiesIn a year unlike any other, we all had to find new ways of doing things, some that we'll keep well into the future.-/-////-/-TopLeft///Standard///YesStandard/HTML
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This past year has required a lot of creativity and some major teaching shifts, and I'm really impressed by all that you've accomplished. We could—and probably will—fill multiple issues of the Connected Professor with stories about creative and innovative new ways you've found to keep your students engaged, interested, and successful in their studies.

This issue alone is full of examples of teaching and learning tools and techniques you've embraced to ensure your classes are as inclusive and effective as possible:

I should note that many of you have gone beyond the now-familiar key services like Canvas, Kaltura, and Zoom to explore the community-building possibilities of VoiceThread and Inscribe (Community Q&A). We very much look forward to telling those stories too.

Thank you for all you've done and continue to do. We know many of you have stretched beyond your comfort zone to use new tools and technologies. We also know that it's never about the tech for its own sake but about what it can do to help you teach your students and succeed. Definitely reach out to your campus teaching center if you need support—we're here for you!

Best,

Justin

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happenings-spring-2021true1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelChances to exchange ideas and explore tech (including one for your students)Chances to exchange ideas and explore tech (including one for your students)Spring 2021 online events/articles/2021-spring/happenings-spring-2021IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/happenings-spring-2021wittmann1616433537364sjengel1617156931834column_namehappeningsshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_pajamapants_desktop.jpgA woman dressed in blouse and jacket for work, but pajama pants on her legs is smiling and looking at the laptop on her lap. Her feet are propped up on the table.329471800600/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_pajamapants_tablet.jpgA woman dressed in blouse and jacket for work, but pajama pants on her legs is smiling and looking at the laptop on her lap. Her feet are propped up on the table.188311200400/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_pajamapants_mobile.jpgA woman dressed in blouse and jacket for work, but pajama pants on her legs is smiling and looking at the laptop on her lap. Her feet are propped up on the table.27505768512///Right
Spring 2021 online events
Chances to exchange ideas and explore tech (including one for your students)/Crimson
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Student Speed Dating with Tech
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Tell your students—it's our first ever speed dating with tech event designed especially for them!

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Much like the faculty-focused events, this will be an opportunity to explore a range of potential tools and services, gaining exposure to a lot of resources in a short time (9 minutes a session):

  • 3D Printing
  • Adobe Rush
  • Adobe Spark
  • Adobe Stock
  • IUanyWare
  • Pressbooks
  • Productivity Power-Ups
  • UITS Chatbot
  • Virtual Reality
  • Zoom Rescue Tips

For more details and the registration link, click here.

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Upcoming at IU teaching centers
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Join colleagues to discuss care, equity, inclusion, and engagement in your classes and beyond.

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April 6, 10:30-11:30am ET (Register)
April 7, 1:30-2:30pm ET (Register)

Coffee Talk: Equity on Trend, Hot Topics in Higher Ed
April 8, 1-2pm ET (Register)

Fail Again, Fail Better Part 2: Encountering Resistance to Creating Equity in Your Teaching
May 7, 1-2:30pm ET (Register)

Coffee Chat: Online Teaching Strategies that Enhance Student Learning
May 12, 9:30-10:30am ET (Register)
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Plater Institute on the Future of Learning
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A chance to collectively explore significant issues in higher education that will influence the future of learning

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This year's Plater Institute builds on IU diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) efforts, aiming to create conversations around fostering antiracism and provide instructors with strategies to implement antiracist pedagogies. 

The purpose of the institute is to:

  1. Raise awareness about the need for antiracist policies and pedagogies in the university community
  2. Provide strategies and resources on how to create, implement, and assess antiracist classroom environments
  3. Showcase examples of campus projects/programs and instructor work that address antiracism in the classroom

Dr. Tambra Jackson, interim dean of the IU School of Education at IUPUI, will deliver the keynote address from 1:10 to 2pm ET.

Learn more and register here.

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Midwest Conference on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
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The conference is divided into concurrent sessions in the morning ($25 faculty-staff/$10 students) and Twitter Quick Hits (free) in the afternoon.

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Our keynote speaker is Christine Harrington, Ph.D., author of Designing a Motivational Syllabus: Creating a Learning Path for Student Engagement, Student Success in College: Doing What Works!, and Dynamic Lecturing: Research-Based Strategies for Evidence-Based Practice.

Learn more and register here.

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Teach, Play, Learn Conference
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Join your colleagues in discovering ways to use games and play to enhance your students' learning experience.

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The Teach, Play, Learn Conference will be held online at no cost. Registration is open now.

Learn more and register.

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feature-khuranatrue1627564893422tlmasonSean WinninghamHow your creativity can encourage students to be more creative as well, and keep them engaged and interestedHow your creativity can encourage students to be more creative as well, and keep them engaged and interestedUsing digital tools and visual imagery for teaching biology/articles/2021-spring/feature-khuranaIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/feature-khuranawittmann1616434095362sjengel1617218799717column_namefeatureshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofkhurana_banner_desktop.jpgA woman is lecturing to a class next to a high-resolution image on a large format, ultra-high resolution, tiled video display system1432591800600/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofkhurana_banner_tablet.jpgA woman is lecturing to a class next to a high-resolution image on a large format, ultra-high resolution, tiled video display system749131200400/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofkhurana_banner_mobile.jpgA woman is lecturing to a class next to a high-resolution image on a large format, ultra-high resolution, tiled video display system62268768512///Right
Using digital tools and visual imagery for teaching biology
How your creativity can encourage students to be more creative as well, and keep them engaged and interested/Crimson
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Parul Khurana
h2FullOne HalfAssociate professor of biology and associate dean for the School of Natural Science and Mathematics, IU East

Dr. Parul Khurana has in the past assigned her students an end-of-semester project to create public service announcements relating to a scientific topic. Her students often ask if they can present it in a variety of ways. Can they create an infographic? Or a YouTube video? Or a moving animation?

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Adobe Creative Campus Faculty Development Institute attendees
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Want to learn more about integrating creative software into your teaching? Reach out to colleagues who attended the Adobe Institute:

  • Dana Anderson, IU Bloomington
  • Kathy Berlin, IUPUI
  • Hitesh Kathuria, IU East
  • Andrea Quennette, IU East
  • Miranda Rodak, IU Bloomington
  • Sarah Smith-Robbins, IU Bloomington
  • Melinda Stanley, IU Kokomo
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This might sound like a description of students in an arts or media course. But Khurana's students are enrolled in the senior capstone course in the biology program at IU East.

In the capstone course, Khurana has always expected students to create a presentation, often in the form of a PowerPoint and an accomplaying oral presentation. But recently, because of interest from her students, she has expanded the options they have in fulfilling the project requirements.

"We have a lot of pre-professional students who want to go into medicine and graduate school," said Khurana. "But a lot of them are very creative, especially when they draw diagrams or make presentations for cell biology and botany. Creativity increases their interest and willingness to do the project."

Besides fostering creativity, Khurana said she sees other benefits to the expanded options. First, in connection to principles of Universal Design for Learning, which emphasize creating multiple means by which students can engage with their learning:

"I knew if I just restricted them to the PowerPoint, it's going to just suppress their creativity, which is not what I wanted to do," she said. "Plus, if they're interested in this, they're going to be more interested in the project and actually give their full attention to it. I think that really matters."

Second, it teaches broader skills in digital literacy and digital communication, especially important for those who understand science and might be able to help explain it to lay audiences.

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Communication is so important. If you're going to conduct scientific research and it's going to be useful for humans, you have to explain it to people who don't have the scientific background.

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In fact, Khurana often relies on her own experience in explaining to students the value of creativity, digital literacy, and communication.

Before she became a biology professor, she grew up in a very creative household. She was always interested in drawing and painting, and her father introduced her to the world of photography. This led her to discovering Adobe Photoshop, which she eventually used in her career.

In graduate school, Khurana would incorporate her photography and visual design skills into her studies and research. She would take images from a microscope and put arrows and rectangles to point out areas of interest, or collect images from a video to create a montage, which led to creating very vivid, clear, and more audience-oriented presentations.

These communication and presentation techniques have helped her stand out in the scientific community, winning awards for her presentations at conferences and becoming an IU Bicentennial Professor.

It's this personal experience, in part, that informs Khurana's belief that being able to creatively and effectively communicate scientific information to audiences in a way that everyone can understand will make her students become better scientists. These skills are vital for others who go into science-adjacent fields, too. For example, she has students who have expressed interest in working for science museums or a career in scientific illustration.

"I think creativity will help there because a person with a science background could help create accurate illustrations and graphics or webpages, posters, or pamphlets for a museum," she said. "Visuals can help make complex concepts more engaging and easy to understand. There is so much science in the news and in social media right now, and I think that's creating more opportunities for students to go into these fields."

Digital literacy is a must-have today, especially when trying to combat scientific misinformation. It is also important for employability and success in various STEM fields. But Khurana knows that creating these opportunities in a course can be difficult when faculty are being asked to rely on new technology so much during the pandemic. However, she still encourages her colleagues to do this by starting small. For example, she suggests using a tool like Adobe Spark, which students can use to easily create web pages, videos, or graphics in a matter of minutes without being technical or visual design experts, or Adobe Premiere Rush, which can be used to quickly and easily edit video together.

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The first thing I would tell faculty is, 'It's easy for you to learn as well. There are so many different creative ways that you can use it in your pedagogy, and it will positively impact student engagement and learning.'

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Getting started with Adobe at IU
h3FullOne HalfMore ways to use creative software in your teaching

IU is the first university to offer no-cost, enterprise-wide access to Adobe Creative Cloud Pro, including Adobe Stock (read the announcement here). And, as one of only 40 Adobe Creative Campuses worldwide, the IU community will benefit from special opportunities like webinars on Adobe Stock. For a wide variety of resources on getting started with Adobe at IU, be sure to visit adobe.iu.edu.

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food-for-thoughttrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelFollow seven simple steps to create more inclusive course contentFollow seven simple steps to create more inclusive course content7 core practices that benefit all students/articles/2021-spring/food-for-thoughtIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/food-for-thoughtwittmann1616433260021tlmason1617199609298column_namefood_for_thoughtshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffoodforthought_rainbowpeople_desktop.jpgA line of cutout paper dolls, each a different color of the rainbow598251800600/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffoodforthought_rainbowpeople_tablet.jpgA line of cutout paper dolls, each a different color of the rainbow335391200400/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffoodforthought_rainbowpeople_mobile.jpgA line of cutout paper dolls, each a different color of the rainbow31510768512///Left
7 core practices that benefit all students
Follow seven simple steps to create more inclusive course content/Crimson
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Successful interactions depend heavily on what we can see, hear, say, touch, learn, and remember. When done well, we can recognize more than just the barriers that people encounter. We also recognize the motivations that all people have in common.
Microsoft Inclusive Design Toolkit

Three statistics highlight why creating inclusive course materials can be a challenge—and why it's best to focus on proactive design approaches that benefit all students:

As the Inclusive Design Toolkit goes on to clarify, instructors also need to consider related limitations like "situational impairments, activity limitations, and restrictions on participation." Examples of these limitations include everyday situations like a short-term injury, reading on a small screen, or working in a loud environment.

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What can you do? For starters, focus on seven simple steps.
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FullOne Half-/-////-/-TopLeft///Standard///YesStandard/HTML<div id="sevenSteps"> <h2>Create Inclusive Documents<br/> in 7 little steps </h2> <div id="ssList"> <div id="ssHeadings" class="step" style="background:#F6DCDC"> <div class="num" aria-hidden="true" style="background:#EBAAAB"><p>1</p></div> <div class="text"> <h3> <span class="visually-hidden">1. </span> Headings </h3> <p>Structure documents and web pages using built-in headings based on the organizational hierarchy of the document. </p> </div> <div class="img" style="background-image: url('imgs/image001.png')"> </div> </div> <div class="notes"> <h4>Notes:</h4> <p>Bonus! If I use headings then I can change font & size & what-not, and it will update all of them automatically! </p> </div> <div id="ssImages" class="step" style="background:#FFB7B7"> <div class="num" aria-hidden="true" style="background:#FF7070"><p>2</p></div> <div class="text"> <h3> <span class="visually-hidden">2. </span> Images </h3> <p> Describe the purpose or content conveyed by an image using alternative text, imagining what text you’d have used if not using the image. </p> </div> <div class="img" style="background-image: url('imgs/image002.png')"> </div> </div> <div class="notes"> <h4>Notes:</h4> <p>Screen readers need text to describe an image for those who can't see it<span class="visually-hidden">. </span> </p> </div> <div id="ssLinks" class="step" style="background:#FCF1DA"> <div class="num" aria-hidden="true" style="background:#F9E4B5"><p>3</p></div> <div class="text"> <h3> <span class="visually-hidden">3. </span> Links </h3> <p> Use link text that describes the link’s destination or function. Instead of “click here” or “read more” use “read more about Psychology 101”. </p> </div> <div class="img" style="background-image: url('imgs/image003.png')"> </div> </div> <div class="notes"> <h4>Notes:</h4> <p>Screen readers only hear the link text - "Click Here" is like asking someone to walk down a dark alley<span class="visually-hidden">. </span> </p> </div> <div id="ssColor" class="step" style="background:#B3FFED"> <div class="num" aria-hidden="true" style="background:#67FFDB"><p>4</p></div> <div class="text"> <h3> <span class="visually-hidden">4. </span> Color </h3> <p> Use text colors that strongly contrast with the background. Don’t use color as the only way to identify something. </p> </div> <div class="img" style="background-image: url('imgs/image004.png')"> </div> </div> <div class="notes"> <h4>Notes:</h4> <p>Strong contrast makes it easier on everyone's eyes<span class="visually-hidden">. </span> </p> </div> <div id="ssLists" class="step" style="background:#B7E4FF"> <div class="num" aria-hidden="true" style="background:#6FCAFF"><p>5</p></div> <div class="text"> <h3> <span class="visually-hidden">5. </span> Lists </h3> <p> Format numbered or bulleted lists using built-in list formats. </p> </div> <div class="img" style="background-image: url('imgs/image005.png')"> </div> </div> <div class="notes"> <h4>Notes:</h4> <p>Wow! By using built-in numbering, the computer will reorder things for me when I make changes. Thank you list-faeries! </p> </div> <div id="ssTables" class="step" style="background:#E4D5DE"> <div class="num" aria-hidden="true" style="background:#C8ACBE"><p>6</p></div> <div class="text"> <h3> <span class="visually-hidden">6. </span> Tables </h3> <p> Use the built-in table tool only for formatting tabular data (not for page layout), and include meaningful column and/or row headers to describe the data. </p> </div> <div class="img" style="background-image: url('imgs/image006.png')"> </div> </div> <div class="notes"> <h4>Notes:</h4> <p>Tables for data & the column tool for columns<span class="visually-hidden">. </span> </p> </div> <div id="ssAV" class="step" style="background:#EEECEA"> <div class="num" aria-hidden="true" style="background:#DDDAD6"><p>7</p></div> <div class="text"> <h3> <span class="visually-hidden">7. </span> Video/Audio </h3> <p> Ensure all videos are accurately captioned, and provide transcripts for audio-only files. </p> </div> <div class="img" style="background-image: url('imgs/image007.png')"> </div> </div> <div class="notes"> <h4>Notes:</h4> <p>"Monkey brains" instead of "Monday pains!?" What are the captioning robots claiming I said? </p> </div> </div> </div>
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Would you like to download a copy for future use? Get a PDF version of the graphic here.

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  1. The Boost mobile app can help students keep up with increasing coursework.
  2. Edge and Safari web browsers will read aloud to you, capturing all page content.
  3. Siri (on iOS devices like iPhone or iPad) will read on-screen text aloud using Speak Screen.
  4. The live transcript in Zoom can help meeting participants follow discussion.
  5. The Google Chrome web browser also recently added live captions for audio and video.
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The costs of last-minute fixes
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If materials aren't designed with accessibility in mind from the beginning, it can be stressful to remediate them all when a student with disabilities enrolls on short notice. If you need the Assistive Technology & Accessibility Centers (ATAC) or a vendor to remediate the materials for you, be prepared to send off the materials two or more weeks in advance. Think: No last-minute PowerPoints!

Want to know which criteria ATAC uses to evaluate course accessibility? Review their course accessibility checklist and feedback form (IU login required).

However, many publishers now maintain lists of their accessible titles (and some commit to at least a base level of accessibility for all their titles published since a certain date). By selecting accessible course texts and focusing on universal design from the outset, you'll have much less to do—and all of your students will benefit.

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how-to-techtrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelNo-cost access to 200 million photos, graphics, and illustrationsNo-cost access to 200 million photos, graphics, and illustrationsGet and keep their attention with Adobe Stock/articles/2021-spring/how-to-techIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/how-to-techwittmann1616434500413sjengel1617137564056column_namehow_to_techshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhowto_panda_desktop.jpgA panda lies on its belly on a large tree branch, arms and legs hanging down on either side.1484681800600/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhowto_panda_tablet.jpgA panda lies on its belly on a large tree branch, arms and legs hanging down on either side.722131200400/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhowto_panda_mobile.jpgA panda lies on its belly on a large tree branch, arms and legs hanging down on either side.62200768512///Right
Get and keep their attention with Adobe Stock
No-cost access to 200 million photos, graphics, and illustrations/Crimson
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Adobe Stock at IU
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If the bored panda in the banner image up top reminds you of certain audience members—whether you're teaching a class, explaining a project, or making a presentation—then you might be in need of some more engaging visuals.

Fortunately, IU faculty, students and staff now have access to Adobe Stock, including more than 200 million photos, graphics, and illustrations. (IU is the first university to offer Adobe Stock to eligible users with access to Adobe Creative Cloud through its contract.)

For more on Adobe Stock at IU, visit the IU Knowledge Base. In the meantime, here are the KB instructions on getting started with Adobe Stock at IU:

  1. Go to the Adobe Stock website.
  2. If you are not already logged in, click the Sign in link.
  3. Enter your IU username followed by @iu.edu (even if your primary IU email address is different), and click Continue.
    1. If prompted, click Company or School Account.
    2. If prompted, log in with your IU username and passphrase.
  4. Search for and select the asset you want. (Note: The unlimited standard assets available to IU users only include photos, illustrations, and vectors.)
  5. Save the asset to your library or download a preview.
    1. To license and download the asset for use in your work, click License.
    2. For assets that have been licensed by an IU user before, a blue checkmark and words indicating it has been licensed will display next to the image. To download one of these assets, click Re-Download for Free.

If you have any issues with Adobe Stock, contact Support Center Tier 2 for assistance.

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Other potential uses for Adobe Stock
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Career: Adobe Stock goes beyond visual imagery. If you're preparing to enter the job market, you can download professional Illustrator templates to set your resume apart from the competition.

Professional: Do you know (or are you) a talented photographer or graphic designer? Expand your portfolio by becoming an Adobe Stock contributor!

To get the most out of Adobe Stock, register for upcoming and on-demand Adobe Stock webinars here.

 

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on-the-lighter-side-ottertrue1627564893422tlmasonBeth NolenTurn on live transcripts in Zoom to make your classes and meetings more inclusiveUsing Otter in ZoomTrain your otter via Zoom/articles/2021-spring/on-the-lighter-side-otterIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/on-the-lighter-side-otterwittmann1616434693989tlmason1617190695588column_namelighter_sideshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflighterside_otters_desktop.jpga group of otters, one standing on the back of another looking at the camera1265171800600/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflighterside_otters_tablet.jpga group of otters, one standing on the back of another looking at the camera626371200400/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflighterside_otters_mobile.jpga group of otters, one standing on the back of another looking at the camera44044768512///Right
Train your otter via Zoom
Turn on live transcripts in Zoom to make your classes and meetings more inclusive/Crimson
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Zoom at IU now features automatic live transcription, which can help improve accessibility in Zoom meetings. The AI app behind the transcriptions is powered by Otter.AI using Ambient Voice Intelligence, which in part means you can train Otter to learn special terminology.

In addition, once the host enables auto-transcription, meeting participants can choose to hide the subtitles, to view a full transcript in a separate pane, or to modify the font size and display of the closed caption area.

 

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Zoom: Automatic Live Transcription

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LeftTwo Thirds-/Kaltura////Yeshttps://iu.mediaspace.kaltura.com/media/t/1_myvv36u1/35231931-/-TopLeft///Zoom: Automatic Live TranscriptionStandard///YesStandard/HTMLZoom at IU now features automatic live transcription, which can help improve accessibility in Zoom meetings. Keep in mind that if you've received an accommodation request, the live transcription service and Zoom is not enough to ensure accessibility in a meeting. For accommodations apart, contact, the assistive technology and accessibility center. The meetings host will need to turn on automatic live transcripts for everyone to have the option to view them to enable the live transcription feature in the menu bar at the bottom of the Zoom window, click on Live transcript. This option is also available under the More option in the Zoom menu when sharing your screen. In the dialog box that appears under the live transcript heading at the bottom of the dialog box. Click the Enable auto transcription button to turn on live transcription. The live transcript subtitles will now display at the bottom of the screen for all participants. All meeting participants, including the meeting host, have the option to hide the subtitles generated by the live transcript tool on their individual device. This does not affect the visibility of subtitles on other participants devices. To hide the subtitles, the Zoom menu bar. Click the arrow to the right of live transcript. In the menu that appears, click Hide Subtitle. The subtitles will no longer be displayed on your screen. To turn them back on, click the arrow to the right of live transcript in the Zoom menu. Then click on Show Subtitle. For more information about the automatic live transcription feature in Zoom at IU, visit the IU knowledge base article, manage automatic live transcription in Zoom at IU, at KB dot IU.edu slash d slash BG SE.
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A few more things to note:

  • The meeting host has to turn on the "Live Transcript" or participants won't be able to use it.
  • Automatic live transcription doesn't work in breakout rooms or in the Zoom application for Linux.
  • The automatic transcript isn't captured as part of your meeting recording, but you can save it as a separate file.

The automatic captions provide benefits everyone can take advantage of: If you're in a noisy setting or otherwise struggling to follow a discussion, the transcript and captions can make all the difference.

Keep in mind that if you've received an accommodation request, the live transcription service in Zoom is not enough to ensure accessibility in a meeting (and it does not work in breakout rooms). For accommodation support, contact the Assistive Technology and Accessibility Center (ATAC).

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Benefits for all types of learners
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A post from Dynamic Language highlights several ways captions and transcripts can improve learning:

  1. Understanding what's said—fast talkers, foreign and regional accents, and specialized vocabulary can make it hard to keep up, but a saved transcript means students can always revisit what was said.
  2. Overcoming problems hearing—whether students are working in a noisy environment, having volume issues, and/or dealing with a hearing impairment, turning on auto-captions can help.
  3. Supporting a range of learning styles—many students find it easier to learn from written material, and reading the words as they're said helps with retaining information.
  4. Improving learning in lectures—instead of scrambling to take detailed notes, students can turn their attention to what's being said and capturing their own ideas and questions.
  5. Broadening access (addressing the digital divide)—internet issues can disrupt online learning no matter how fast your connection may be, but transcripts mean course content is still available.
  6. Recording discussions for review—a saved transcript means a student can focus on participating in a larger group discussion instead of capturing it in their notes.

 

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in-case-you-missed-ittrue1627564893422tlmasonvarious sourcesRecent news about teaching and learning with technologyRecent news about teaching and learning with technologyIn case you missed it/articles/2021-spring/in-case-you-missed-itIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/in-case-you-missed-itwittmann1616422245886sjengel1617158075829column_nameicymishort-display-nameICYMIalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_missedtrain_desktop.jpgA man wearing a backpack and holding tickets in his hand is on a train platform running after a moving train4505941800600/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_missedtrain_tablet.jpgA man wearing a backpack and holding tickets in his hand is on a train platform running after a moving train2323921200400/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_missedtrain_mobile.jpgA man wearing a backpack and holding tickets in his hand is on a train platform running after a moving train47070768512///Left
In Case You Missed It
Recent news about teaching and learning with technology/Crimson
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IU eTexts initiative celebrates 10 years of saving students money
IU eTexts has evolved as a national leader in digital educational materials and saved students over $69 million off retail prices in the process.

Indiana University renews contract to provide Adobe software at no cost to all students, faculty, staff
IU makes history as first university to offer enterprise-wide Creative Cloud Pro, featuring stock photo service.

IU3D: Expanding access to cultural heritage by creating virtual spaces
The IU3D team uses a tool called Matterport to capture cultural heritage spaces in order to provide virtual access to the space and to preserve changing exhibits.

Remote teaching and learning means reviewing these cybersecurity tips
You don't need to be a technical expert to make the computer in your home office harder to hack.

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From the LT List
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Focused on teaching and learning with technology, the LT List is for IU instructors and those who support them—but anyone is welcome to join. Learn how to subscribe to the list here.

New edition of Teaching for Student Success 
Build a foundation of teaching excellence that supports all your students through graduation.

Live transcripts, Scholars Book Fair, stat/math software, and more
Be sure to turn on the live transcript in Zoom for your next class or meeting, and take advantage of affordable content and no-cost stat/math software at IU.

Zoom Valentine 2021 (Nothing compares to you)
Revisiting our love letter to Zoom, complete with lyrics for a song of our times, "Nothing compares to Zoom."

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Webinar & event recordings
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Reimagining Engagement in Teaching and Learning
Access recordings from the FACET virtual conference, featuring authors of articles in the Journal of Teaching and Learning with Technology (JoTLT) special issue on transitioning teaching and learning during the pandemic.

Zoom Alchemy: Active Learning in the Virtual Classroom
Revisit this webinar recording to experience active learning in Zoom first-hand and leave with engagement activities you can immediately implement in your class.

Google at IU My Drive: Individual File Management Basics
Revisit this IT Training webinar recording to learn how to find, organize, edit, and share your files on My Drive.

Microsoft OneDrive at IU: Individual file management basics
Revisit this IT Training webinar recording to learn how to find, organize, edit, and share your files on OneDrive.

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indextrue1627564893422tlmasonSummer 2021, Preparing for the return to campus, issue of the Connected Professor.Summer 2021: Preparing for the return to campus/articles/2021-spring/indexIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/indextlmason1627564465373tlmason1627564690401short-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idThe Connected Professor: Fall 2019 EditionA fresh look at teaching and learning technology at IU./images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgibau_large.jpggibau_large.jpgGina Sánchez Gibau standing on the IUPUI campus.1187651800600The Connected Professor: Fall 2019 EditionA fresh look at teaching and learning technology at IU./images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgibau_large.jpggibau_large.jpgGina Sánchez Gibau standing on the IUPUI campus.1187651800600Text Overlay/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadfeature_underwater_desktop.jpgJardin du Luxembourg, Paris, France14135631800600/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadfeature_underwater_tablet.jpgJardin du Luxembourg, Paris, France6964561200400/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/leadfeature_underwater_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadfeature_underwater_mobile.jpgJardin du Luxembourg, Paris, France555631768512///Right
Faculty success stories
Things we'll keep from 2020: Top Hat, OneNote, Virtual Reality, TeamsRead more/articles/2021-spring/lead-feature-things-to-keepcolumn_namefeatureshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/lead-feature-things-to-keepIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflead-feature-things-to-keepFaculty success storiesThings we'll keep from 2020: Top Hat, OneNote, Virtual Reality, TeamsSarah EngelThings we'll keep from 2020: Top Hat, OneNote, Virtual Reality, TeamsLight Gray
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2021-spring/taking-notecolumn_nametaking_noteshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/taking-noteIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproftaking-noteRemoving barriers to student successTeaching and engaging students through multiple meansJustin ZemlyakTeaching and engaging students through multiple meanswidecontent-left/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofjz_banner_desktop.jpgJustin Zemlyak, Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies1057361800600/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofjz_banner_tablet.jpgJustin Zemlyak, Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies562921200400/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/jz_banner_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofjz_banner_mobile.jpgJustin Zemlyak, Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies54571768512/articles/2021-spring/happenings-spring-2021column_namehappeningsshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/happenings-spring-2021IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings-spring-2021Spring 2021 online eventsChances to exchange ideas and explore tech (including one for your students)Sarah EngelChances to exchange ideas and explore tech (including one for your students)narrow-/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_pajamapants_desktop.jpgA woman dressed in blouse and jacket for work, but pajama pants on her legs is smiling and looking at the laptop on her lap. Her feet are propped up on the table.329471800600/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_pajamapants_tablet.jpgA woman dressed in blouse and jacket for work, but pajama pants on her legs is smiling and looking at the laptop on her lap. Her feet are propped up on the table.188311200400/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/happenings_pajamapants_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_pajamapants_mobile.jpgA woman dressed in blouse and jacket for work, but pajama pants on her legs is smiling and looking at the laptop on her lap. Her feet are propped up on the table.27505768512/_custom-sections/2021-spring/Layout 2IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofLayout 2Text
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2021-spring/feature-khuranacolumn_namefeatureshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/feature-khuranaIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffeature-khuranaUsing digital tools and visual imagery for teaching biologyHow your creativity can encourage students to be more creative as well, and keep them engaged and interestedSean WinninghamHow your creativity can encourage students to be more creative as well, and keep them engaged and interestedfullcontent-right/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofkhurana_banner_desktop.jpgA woman is lecturing to a class next to a high-resolution image on a large format, ultra-high resolution, tiled video display system1432591800600/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofkhurana_banner_tablet.jpgA woman is lecturing to a class next to a high-resolution image on a large format, ultra-high resolution, tiled video display system749131200400/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/khurana_banner_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofkhurana_banner_mobile.jpgA woman is lecturing to a class next to a high-resolution image on a large format, ultra-high resolution, tiled video display system62268768512/_custom-sections/2021-spring/Layout 3IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofLayout 3Text
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2021-spring/food-for-thoughtcolumn_namefood_for_thoughtshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/food-for-thoughtIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffood-for-thought7 core practices that benefit all studentsFollow seven simple steps to create more inclusive course contentSarah EngelFollow seven simple steps to create more inclusive course contentnarrowcontent-left/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffoodforthought_rainbowpeople_desktop.jpgA line of cutout paper dolls, each a different color of the rainbow598251800600/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffoodforthought_rainbowpeople_tablet.jpgA line of cutout paper dolls, each a different color of the rainbow335391200400/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/foodforthought_rainbowpeople_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffoodforthought_rainbowpeople_mobile.jpgA line of cutout paper dolls, each a different color of the rainbow31510768512/articles/2021-spring/how-to-techcolumn_namehow_to_techshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/how-to-techIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhow-to-techGet and keep their attention with Adobe StockNo-cost access to 200 million photos, graphics, and illustrationsSarah EngelNo-cost access to 200 million photos, graphics, and illustrationswide-/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhowto_panda_desktop.jpgA panda lies on its belly on a large tree branch, arms and legs hanging down on either side.1484681800600/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhowto_panda_tablet.jpgA panda lies on its belly on a large tree branch, arms and legs hanging down on either side.722131200400/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/howto_panda_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhowto_panda_mobile.jpgA panda lies on its belly on a large tree branch, arms and legs hanging down on either side.62200768512/_custom-sections/2021-spring/Layout 4IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofLayout 4Text
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2021-spring/on-the-lighter-side-ottercolumn_namelighter_sideshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/on-the-lighter-side-otterIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofon-the-lighter-side-otterTrain your otter via ZoomTurn on live transcripts in Zoom to make your classes and meetings more inclusiveBeth NolenUsing Otter in Zoomwidecontent-left/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflighterside_otters_desktop.jpga group of otters, one standing on the back of another looking at the camera1265171800600/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflighterside_otters_tablet.jpga group of otters, one standing on the back of another looking at the camera626371200400/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/lighterside_otters_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflighterside_otters_mobile.jpga group of otters, one standing on the back of another looking at the camera44044768512/articles/2021-spring/in-case-you-missed-itcolumn_nameicymishort-display-nameICYMIalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2021-spring/in-case-you-missed-itIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofin-case-you-missed-itIn case you missed itRecent news about teaching and learning with technologyvarious sourcesRecent news about teaching and learning with technologynarrow-/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_missedtrain_desktop.jpgA man wearing a backpack and holding tickets in his hand is on a train platform running after a moving train4505941800600/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_missedtrain_tablet.jpgA man wearing a backpack and holding tickets in his hand is on a train platform running after a moving train2323921200400/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2021-spring/icymi_missedtrain_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_missedtrain_mobile.jpgA man wearing a backpack and holding tickets in his hand is on a train platform running after a moving train47070768512/_custom-sections/2021-spring/Layout 5IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofLayout 5Text
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2020-year-endtrue1617110812396tlmasonYear-end 2020/articles/2020-year-endIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-endtlmason1604323035793tlmason1606927520609issue-titleBuilding and extending community even when socially distancedshort-display-nameYear-end 2020alternate-link-labelnavigation-setNoneif-not-now-then-whentrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelDeveloping a first year seminar with lasting lessons about race, diversity, and communityDeveloping a first year seminar with lasting lessons about race, diversity, and communityIf not now, then when?/articles/2020-year-end/if-not-now-then-whenIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/if-not-now-then-whensjengel1606770901655sjengel1606962366114column_namefeatureshort-display-nameIf not now, then when?alternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_banner.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_banner.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblm_mural_banner.jpgBlack Lives Matter street mural on north side of IUPUI campus. Photo by Indiana University photographer Liz Kaye.3007791800600/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblm_mural_tablet.jpgBlack Lives Matter street mural on north side of IUPUI campus. Photo by Indiana University photographer Liz Kaye.1444261200400/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblm_mural_mobile.jpgBlack Lives Matter street mural on north side of IUPUI campus. Photo by Indiana University photographer Liz Kaye.109417768512///Left
If not now, then when?
Developing a first year seminar with lasting lessons about race, diversity, and community/Crimson
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A conversation with Jean Abshire and Melissa Fry
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Jean Abshire felt unqualified to lead a far-reaching discussion on race, but saw the importance of doing something as the School of Social Sciences after George Floyd's killing. By bringing in colleagues like Melissa Fry, whose career took shape in response to the Rodney King verdict and aftermath, she was able to build a collaborative effort focused on producing meaningful change.

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Jean Abshire, associate professor of political science and international studies at IU Southeast

JA: Jean Abshire, associate professor of political science and international studies at IU Southeast.

Melissa Fry, associate professor of sociology & director of the Applied Research and Education Center at IU Southeast

MF: Melissa Fry, associate professor of sociology & director of the Applied Research and Education Center at IU Southeast.

Adam Maksl, associate professor of journalism and media at IU Southeast and faculty fellow for eLearning design and innovation in UITS

AM: Adam Maksl, associate professor of journalism and media at IU Southeast & faculty fellow for eLearning design and innovation in UITS.

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Jean Abshire's June 1st email to colleagues powerfully captured the intensity of the moment and the need for thoughtful conversation: We are the School of Social Sciences, and our society is convulsing in conflict and pain. This is our time. There's no one whose wheelhouse this is more than ours. It can't wait until fall. I've set up a Zoom room. If you're interested, come talk.

Nobody responded to her call to action following George Floyd's killing, and she began to wonder if she'd be sitting in that Zoom room alone. She raised it again in a faculty meeting. Colleague Melissa Fry noted that she thought they needed to do something—but, like others in the department, she wanted to make sure it wasn't just window dressing.

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We need to ensure that whatever we do is about producing meaningful change within our institution, our systems, and our roles. But we can also provide resources to the community and to our students.

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Here is a conversation about what they've accomplished thus far, aided by technology but largely driven by motivated people who gave up summer research time and pandemic course prep to develop something impactful. Adam Maksl, a colleague and faculty fellow for Learning Technologies, interviewed Abshire and Fry.

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AM: How did the pandemic and this moment influence what you decided to do? Why integrate something based on technology, instead of something simpler like making resources available for people to incorporate in their classes?

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JA: For me, just presenting resources was not going to be effective because I think too many faculty feel that race is too hard to talk about and don't feel confident enough—especially in a time when emotions are running high and managing the discussion may be even harder.

To me, it had to be something that was fully developed that faculty could just implement but hopefully do even more with. It was loaded into the First Year Seminar (FYS) in Canvas as a default after discussions with the FYS director, who thought most people would be open to it. If faculty were not going to do this module, they had to actively take the step of opting out.

MF: All of us are probably working more hours than we've ever worked before while trying to address this emergent need and outcry. The advantage of the technology is that experts on race built the module so that the people who aren't experts knew they could count on the material and curation. That is one of the beauties of this effort—bringing together contributions from psychology, criminology, sociology, political science, journalism, history.

If the module continues to be part of the FYS, all incoming students will go through it as part of their introduction to being part of this community, which is a great leverage point. It may not be a dramatic systemic change, but it says something about the tone of our campus, I think, or has the capacity to. But we need to do a number of these things.

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AM: How did you decide where to start, knowing that you had a tight timeline (two weeks that happily turned into four)?

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JA: We had the idea of doing a course and from that we were like, wait, we could do the First Year Seminar (FYS) module first and fastest and then build the course after that. It was a very collaborative effort on Zoom to figure out what components were most important. And we picked out the most critical streams that we could do quickly and approachably.

Incoming students with less than 26 credit hours—so all true freshmen and a few transfer students—are required to take the FYS. It's a combination of welcome to our campus and our family, and pretty intensive college survival skills and tools. But it's also a way to reach a large number of people at a time when hopefully they're open to getting new perspectives when their expectations of the college experience are still being formed.

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From the get-go, as students enter IU Southeast (IUS), they're learning that being part of a diverse community – and being aware of and engaged in that diversity – is what it means to join our learning community. Coming into this community means addressing these issues and being self-aware and aware of the people around you and the value of that diversity to your education.

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AM: What's in the module, and how did it come together?

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MF: We have the introduction, "What is racism?," cognitive biases then microaggressions, how and why it matters (how racism is influencing people's lives), and a piece on being an ally. We close with "What kind of society do you want to live in?".

We're giving them a very brief overview of this important set of concepts and ideas. And then trying to get students to think about what kind of world they want to live in—we want to encourage them to use their time at IUS to build the community they want to be a part of.

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AM: I think there are a lot of people who are having these conversations or are feeling like we need to do something. But there's this disconnectedness, right? We can't all congregate in our offices or walk down the hall and have that sort of moment when an idea comes up and we mobilize and get something done.

You all were able to use technology to try to replicate some of that energy and that purpose and that community building. Could you talk about what advice you might give to others who want to do something that has an impact? How do we do it in this moment especially?

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JA: Realistically, given the moment and the demands on people's lives, not everybody could make every meeting. But we were able to share documents in Teams, and post notes and minutes from the meeting, while keeping track of our to-do list.

MF: People could get their notes in real-time and know that we were all looking at the same notes, but also we weren't flooding their inbox. Keeping the dialogue mostly in the posts within that channel is one of the huge benefits of Teams. If I can keep the dialogue on a project in one place, it is so much more effective and productive for not losing track of a thread.

All of our process and chatting was in Teams, but we shifted over to Canvas to build the module. And the chat function in Teams allowed last-minute problems to be resolved very quickly. But I also want to be careful not to think that technology means we can go to the moon and back either. While technology can facilitate these learning communities and social connections, there's also a big learning curve that adds to the cognitive load.

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I don't think Teams or Canvas or Zoom would have made any difference in our initiative had we not had motivated people who cared and wanted to do it right. The technology makes things easier, but it's not going to override the necessity of people who care.

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AM: What's next?

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JA: I invited our head of equity and diversity to our first meeting. And his big takeaway message was, you know, it's great that you're here in June. Are you still going to be here in October and next April and next June? And I think that's a super important message because as a society we have a very short attention span. I still think we needed to do something fast, that we couldn't let things go on. But the idea of making sure that this extends into the semester, into next semester and beyond, is also a key thing.

We have several events planned throughout the academic year. We also have a class or two we'll come back to planning. Maybe we could use the Expand IU platform to do something similar to the FYS module but community-facing, so we could take it beyond our campus and give the communities some tools they can use.

MF: For me, because I do community-facing work, it's a fairly strong priority to try to create something that other people can access and use. I think it would be really good for us to build a module-driven kind of tool that could be used in that way. And that would incorporate the expertise we do have around campus because we have more than people would realize.

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AM: What do you hope people will take away from reading this interview?

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MF: I would love to see interdisciplinary groups of faculty tackling some key issues like climate change and the addictions epidemic. A great tool like this could be used in a lot of places within the curriculum, with expertise coming from different disciplines to provide a much fuller picture than when you just look at one discipline's approach.

We should use the learning from this (and other campuses should as well) to think about where we want to bring multiple voices to bear on a particular topic and create easy access to an interdisciplinary learning opportunity or module. All of us—faculty, students, and the broader public—would benefit. Even faculty benefit from the creation of these kinds of things in terms of having learning communities to tap into.

JA: I think that is important because there's obviously huge interplay across the disciplines and the story is really incomplete without these different perspectives being integrated.

By producing expert resources that faculty can rely on, this approach also helps share the burden of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) efforts more widely rather than constantly calling on minoritized faculty who are already overburdened. Echoing Melissa's words, it's a way of building the community, society, and world we want to live in and share with others.

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supporting-pervasive-teaching-excellencetrue1627564893422tlmasonMichael MorroneSharing best practices in teaching and learningBest practices in teaching and learningSupporting Pervasive Teaching Excellence/articles/2020-year-end/supporting-pervasive-teaching-excellenceIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/supporting-pervasive-teaching-excellencewittmann1606838777672tlmason1606932944541column_nametaking_noteshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproftakingnote_mmorrone_desktop.jpgMichael Morrone1186001800600/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproftakingnote_mmorrone_tablet.jpgMichael Morrone636141200400/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproftakingnote_mmorrone_mobile.jpgMichael Morrone59177768512///Left
Supporting pervasive teaching excellence
Sharing best practices in teaching and learning/Crimson
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I've long been committed to creating opportunities for IU and its faculty to promote, nurture, and recognize excellence in teaching and learning within and across campuses, schools, and disciplines. This is precisely the vision of IU's Faculty Academy on Excellence in Teaching (FACET). FACET members, since the organization's inception in 1989, have a history of pedagogical innovation, commitment to studying and sharing best practices in teaching and learning, and embracing the notion that we teach and learn in community.

Through the years, FACET has been fortunate to have many collaborators across IU who believe in the pursuit of excellence in teaching and learning. Two more recent outcomes of these important collaborations include the Teaching for Student Success (TSS) self-enrolling course (available through expand.iu.edu) and the Teaching.IU website (teaching.iu.edu). I am proud to say that both resources are built by IU for IU.

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Teaching for Student Success: An Evidence-Based Approach
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Contact your TSS Faculty Fellows to join a spring cohort:
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TSS, featured in the winter 2020 issue of The Connected Professor, presents an evidence-based approach to teaching and learning. Step-by-step instructions and videos of how faculty apply strategies are central to the approach, and downloadable handouts and worksheets guide others through applying concepts to practice.

Faculty who complete TSS will design an entire course that applies evidence-based practices, while engaging with the modules on their own terms and reviewing pieces of content that are most helpful at a given moment.

TSS is an ongoing collaborative project. Currently, we are revising the course to build on the six teaching foundations modules with two new paths that will contain the same features as the original modules and have their own completion certificates:

  • An Active Learning Path that contains four modules: "Helping Students Learn How to Learn," "Active Learning," "High Impact Practices," and "Sustained Collaborative Learning Projects"
  • A Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Path with three modules that infuse DEI practices into the development of one's teaching philosophy, extending through classroom practices to establishing a departmental culture that supports IU's Anti-racist Agenda

We expect these paths to go live during the winter session. Faculty can proceed through the modules on their own at their own pace; however, each campus also will have a spring cohort facilitated by a TSS Faculty Fellow.

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Strategy-focused redesign of Teaching.IU
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The original teaching.iu.edu launched in October 2017. President McRobbie in his 2017 State of the University address identified it as "a major step forward in gathering in one place and making readily available IU's many teaching resources." Like TSS, building the site was the result of university-wide collaboration, including UITS, FACET, and various academic stakeholders.

The redesigned site, with an anticipated fall 2021 release, will remain a portal to IU's many teaching resources; however, it will center much more directly on teaching strategies and the ingredients to carry out the strategies with excellence. Instructors and faculty development staff will have profiles and the ability to collect and share the strategies and tools they use to teach and help ensure student success in their courses.

I am excited that instructors and faculty development staff will be able to share their effective strategies with the IU community through teaching.iu.edu. Many of us collect these strategies and look for outlets to share. Submitted strategies will go through a review process, giving faculty another way to document teaching effectiveness, which could prove useful in annual reports and promotion dossiers. The redesigned teaching.iu.edu will make wide sharing of strategies in a customized, easy-to-navigate format.

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Contribute to our resource library
h3RightOne HalfThe new Teaching.IU will showcase concise summaries of effective and/or innovative teaching practices (check out a sample here). These resources will present strategies and tactics that have already been implemented in a course, have improved students' learning experiences, and are useful to colleagues. We'd love to hear from you. Click the panel to view a sample or submit a strategy.

The new Teaching.IU will showcase concise summaries of effective and/or innovative teaching practices (check out a sample here). These resources will present strategies and tactics that have already been implemented in a course, have improved students’ learning experiences, and are useful to colleagues.

Submit a strategy that’s worked for you. We’d love to hear from you.

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I invite you to explore TSS and our first version of teaching.iu.edu. Join a TSS cohort or create a TSS discussion group on your campus. Share a teaching strategy for teaching.iu.edu or TSS and help IU attain and sustain the pervasive spread of teaching excellence.

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happenings-winter-2020true1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelJoin us for year-end and early 2021 eventsWinter 2020 event listingsHappenings Winter 2020/articles/2020-year-end/happenings-winter-2020IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/happenings-winter-2020sjengel1606849892390sjengel1607007250630column_namehappeningsshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofswit_25in21_banner_register_desktop.jpgA speaker making a presentation in front of a large audience and the Statewide IT 2021 logo2313961800600/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofswit_25in21_banner_register_tablet.jpgA speaker making a presentation in front of a large audience and the Statewide IT 2021 logo1231091200400/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofswit_25in21_banner_register_mobile.jpgA speaker making a presentation in front of a large audience and the Statewide IT 2021 logo54645768512///Right
Happenings: Winter 2020 and beyond
Join us for 2020 year-end and 2021 kick-off events/Crimson
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SoTL Event: Myths and Truths about HyFlex Learning
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What it is, what it is not, and how it can help you build needed flexibility into your courses

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HyFlex Learning is being discussed more than ever as a potential solution to the challenges universities are facing today in delivering high-quality learning to students in multiple ways, yet it is hard to land on a common description of what it actually is in practice.

The panelists will help define the HyFlex approach, discuss how faculty can use it to build flexibility into their courses in a way that promotes student success and address some common myths that get in the way of being able to leverage the benefits of the approach. 

Learn more and register at citl.indiana.edu

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CODED BIAS Film Screening and Panel Discussion
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Join CEW&T and the IU Cinema for a virtual screening of CODED BIAS with a panel discussion.

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CODED BIAS is a groundbreaking documentary feature on bias in artificial intelligence, and the women data scientists and mathematicians fighting to expose its threat to civil liberties and democracy.

Learn more and register at events.iu.edu

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Zoom Alchemy: Active Learning in the Virtual Classroom
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Feel like you're in a Zoom slump? Experience active learning in Zoom first-hand.

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Class sessions on Zoom can be engaging and even invigorating, but it doesn't just happen on its own—it needs you. Experience active learning in Zoom first-hand and leave with engagement activities you can immediately implement in your class in this mash-up of Zoom features and IU's technology smorgasbord.

Learn more and register here for December 8 or here for January 13 (open to all campuses).

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Virtual Speed Dating with Learning Technologies
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Explore potential tools and services, gaining important insights in a short time

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You will have around 9 minutes to "speed date" (i.e., learn about) a specific tool or service before meeting your next "date." Each Zoom breakout room will introduce a resource of interest to a broad audience, including some unfamiliar ones. Matchmakers (presenters) include staff from across UITS Learning Technologies.

Check out the full list of topics and RSVP at https://go.iu.edu/3q3d

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Virtual Statewide IT Conference 2021
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Pre-conference activities, keynote talks, breakout sessions, virtual networking opportunities, and maybe even some games

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Don't miss out on the Virtual Statewide IT Conference 2021, which will take place January 20–22. Register now to receive updates on all conference events, including speakers, networking opportunities, and our Virtual Expo.

Got a kudo for a colleague? Submit it here.

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teaching-with-and-in-virtual-realitytrue1627564893422tlmasonJeannette LehrReal-life advantages that go well beyond the wow factorUsing VR in the remote learning classroomTeaching with and in virtual reality/articles/2020-year-end/teaching-with-and-in-virtual-realityIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/teaching-with-and-in-virtual-realitywittmann1606150999063sjengel1607014868478column_namefeatureshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-year-end/vr_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/vr_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofvr_desktop.jpgInstructor wearing a VR headset and a screen of what she's seeing; students watch from semicircular seating.1443271800600/images/2020-year-end/vr_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/vr_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofvr_tablet.jpgInstructor wearing a VR headset and a screen of what she's seeing; students watch from semicircular seating.712461200400/images/2020-year-end/vr_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/vr_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofvr_mobile.jpgInstructor wearing a VR headset and a screen of what she's seeing; students watch from semicircular seating.61423768512///Right
Teaching with and in virtual reality
Real-life advantages that go well beyond the wow factor/Crimson
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Elizabeth Thill
h2FullOne HalfDirector, Classical Studies Program, IUPUIAssistant Professor of Classical Studies in World Languages and Cultures, IUPUI

Jeannette Lehr, from UITS Student Outreach, met (in VR, of course) with Professor Elizabeth Thill and University Library's Jenny Johnson and Ryan Knapp to discuss how teaching with VR is much more than a neat trick.

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Dr. Elizabeth Thill has reiterated time and again to skeptics in her field that virtual reality has serious pedagogical applications. It's not just a fun way to get students interested; it is in fact integral to her curriculum. Thill uses VR in her courses on The Art and Archaeology of Rome, Myth and Reality in Classical Art, and Sex and Gender in the Ancient World, where she is able to demonstrate architectural and sculptural details of ancient artifacts in a way that is so effective, it's been game changing to her teaching.

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About a year ago Dr. Thill met Jenny Johnson and Ryan Knapp while working on a project that involved 3D scans of ancient sculptures. Jenny Johnson is the head of digitization services for University Library and provides access to and preserves cultural heritage objects via 3D scanning. Thill was impressed with the beauty and quality of 3D scans of ancient objects, but she was not sure how they could be useful.

Then Ryan Knapp, technology services manager at University Library, showed Thill what the scans looked like in a high-quality VR headset. The ability to (virtually) move around and touch the artifacts impressed Thill. She was hooked, and she started using VR to teach her students about ancient artifacts. And so the journey began in fall 2019: Knapp placing the scans in VR and developing entire VR experiences, including ancient architectural buildings and environments in which to house the sculptures; Jenny facilitating the whole process; and Thill curating it all for her students.

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FullOne HalfTHIS CHUNK FOR PHOTO SLIDESHOW. UNDER TYPE, I DON'T HAVE "IMAGE" AS AN OPTION.Slideshow/-////-/-TopLeft///Standard/images/2020-year-end/vrslideshow_picture1.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/vrslideshow_picture1.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofvrslideshow_picture1.pngVR Roman-inspired courtyard with 3D objects490048768512

Dr. Thill, Ryan Knapp, and Jenny Johnson discuss virtual reality in education with Jeannette Lehr while in a VR simulated Roman-inspired courtyard compiled by Knapp. Each participant was able to be present in the same virtual space from the comfort of their homes/offices, as a different color-coordinated pair of head and hand avatars. Knapp built the avatars from an open access Scan the World model of the famous Fonseca Bust that resides in the Musei Capitolini. With a nod to the IUPUI Jaguars, Knapp added jaguar spots to the hands.

/images/2020-year-end/vrslideshow_picture2.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/vrslideshow_picture2.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofvrslideshow_picture2.pngDr. Thill, with VR headset on, in front of classroom screen demonstrating how she can turn an object in 3D space544936768512

Thill is able to pick up, rotate, and compare two theorized reconstructions of what the Etruscan Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus may have looked like while teaching a class on Roman Art and Archaeology.

/images/2020-year-end/vrslideshow_picture3.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/vrslideshow_picture3.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofvrslideshow_picture3.pngDr. Thill, with VR headset on, manipulating an object on screen for the class572387768512

Dr. Thill is able to rotate an artifact and point out its unique markings to students while teaching her class Myth and Reality in Classical Art.

/images/2020-year-end/vrslideshow_picture4.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/vrslideshow_picture4.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofvrslideshow_picture4.pngDr. Thill, VR headset on, standing by a classroom screen which shows a landscape with a number of 3D objects stacked on top of each other381880768512

Dr. Thill teaches excavation theory to students during her class Roman Art and Archaeology.

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However, with the move online in spring 2020, Thill went back to using PowerPoint. It was then that she was able to see the stark difference between what had once been her preferred teaching tool, PowerPoint, and what has emerged as the best way to convey information about the ancient world: virtual reality. After a semester of settling for 2D presentations, Thill went back to teaching with VR for the fall semester of 2020. Even displaying the VR experience to her students in remote Zoom lectures far surpasses the old model.

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"I thought students would be annoyed with glitches, but they mostly think it's funny," said Thill. They all laughed when she got trapped under the Athenian Acropolis. "I think they really enjoy the sense of cutting-edge technology."

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A lot of instructors think that in order to use VR in their classes, every student would have to have a VR headset. But Thill suggests starting with demonstrating VR by having one quality $300 headset and projecting the display onto a screen for the class to see. Students don't have to put on the headset to have a quality learning experience. In addition, many students are visual learners and being able to see artifacts from different angles in VR, or to see a professor like Thill walk around a space, gives them a deeper understanding.

With VR, Thill can spend her valuable time preparing more substantive content for her lectures. Instead of being able to talk about only a couple of sculptures using 2D slides and lots of time describing them, she is able to pick up 16 different sculptures and raise them in the air for students to see from different angles. They get to see it all in-depth and much more efficiently in VR. It opens up so much more time for her to talk about the meaning behind the qualities of the architecture and artifacts—what it means that the building was structured in certain ways, and that's really the more important part.

Knapp and Johnson believe that this kind of opportunity will be expanded to more students when educators and administrators get the chance to try out high-quality headsets for themselves. Knapp and Johnson believe that when you see it for yourself, you can't ignore the potential. Thill feels the same way about buy-in for professionals in her field. "In classical studies, we're used to putting together tiny paper models of the Forum of Trajan and seeing which one looks stupider. Whereas Ryan can build me an entire Forum of Trajan in VR that I can walk through and test hypotheses," said Thill. Only time will tell when and if VR takes off in higher education, but if you ask Thill, now is a great time to start.

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When asked about their favorite things about VR and their next steps in the medium, each of our VR experts had this to say:

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Jenny Johnson
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Johnson said that seeing the student reactions to VR and inspiring them to pursue this technology is what impressed her most about this endeavor. "We may be changing future careers," she said.

For Johnson, an ideal future for this line of work is one where VR and 3D digitization are core services of academic libraries. She sees a long-lasting future for this kind of work and thinks it has the potential to be game-changing for many university library systems.

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Ryan Knapp
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For Knapp, knowing that there are so many things to come that we haven't seen yet is the most exciting thing about VR. "In VR, you aren't bound by the limitations of the physical world," he said. People who wouldn't normally have the opportunity to go to Rome, or even Mars, will have the opportunity to do so in a realistic way.

Knapp's next steps will be creating multi-user virtual learning spaces where students and instructors can interact together in a simulated classroom environment. And then, taking it outside the classroom is after that. Knapp's ultimate goal is to build a realistic and immersive recreation of Ancient Rome so students can travel the streets, view the architecture, and learn what it was like to walk the streets of Rome.

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Dr. Thill
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VR is a democratized medium, and that is what Thill loves the most about VR. VR is a way to bring things and experiences to people who couldn't otherwise afford to experience them. Like other new technologies in the past, VR opens up options to more people. Thill really believes that VR is not just nifty; it's game changing. "We're talking about hard core research, hard core pedagogical advantages," Thill said. "You can do things in VR that you cannot do in real life."

For Thill, the next step will be a debate held in VR, in the Parthenon. She says students will be joining the virtual space this time. All of the technical details haven't been worked out yet, but Thill is excited to get students into VR to interact with the ancient world in an even more immersive way.

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What should instructors do if they’re interested in exploring VR?
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Thill cautions instructors who are new to VR not to try to create the more in-depth experiences, similar to what she's been doing, on their own. If you want to create customized experiences, you need someone like Johnson and Knapp to help you with the technology development aspect. Thill is thankful that IUPUI has staff in the position to do this kind of work with VR. Thill believes this work is worthy of professional support and she hopes all campuses will have VR developers on staff eventually. Knapp says that even if you don't teach from the IUPUI campus, "I would encourage instructors to talk with us. We're happy to work with them on finding different possible applications." They said once instructors come up with a need to ask for help.

Thill recommends going at VR with very specific pedagogical goals. Adjust your expectations. Especially in the beginning, you won't be able to have everything you want in VR, but you can do a lot.

Read more about Thill's work in VR in a piece written for IUPUI's The Campus Citizen, or experience a VR tour with Thill below.

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Credits and contact
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This team's research has received very generous support from the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and is now part of their Incubator Project with Dr. Jason Kelly. The student participation has been funded by the UL + CDS and the IUPUI Center for Research and Learning, now part of the IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education. Dr. Thill, Ryan Knapp, and Jenny Johnson have generously offered to share their contact information with interested instructors. Feel free to contact them with questions:

Dr. Elizabeth Thill, Assistant Professor and Program Director of Classical Studies at IUPUI,

Ryan Knapp, Technology Services Manager at IUPUI’s University Library,

Jenny Johnson, Head of Digitization Services at IUPUI’s University Library,

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Want to see Dr. Thill in virtual action? Check out Thill's VR tour of a reconstructed atrium-peristyle domus like those found in Pompeii, decorated with actual domestic paintings found in similar houses in Pompeii.

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so this is the hairstyle
uh of a roman house um and this is gonna
be
um sort of a gathering space for the
family but it also lets in light and air
circulation
but if you can follow me here we're
gonna go
out the door
and see how the roman house
actually functions in a very different
way that we would expect a house to
function so if you're out here with me
and you turn and you look through the
door
you can actually see all the way into
the house
because this was a public space used to
frame
someone to the public so stay where
stay where you are for two seconds
so if i am the clock the patron
i am the owner of the house you are
clients all right you're dependent on me
and you're walking
in uh for the morning salutatio and you
see me framed
in this great room with this nice
background and i look so rich and cool
right now
you're ready to vote for me so come on
in come on into the atrium
come on in and i'm going to let you come
even closer
um jeanette i'll take your questions
first uh ryan you just stand there and
wait
so jeanette you can come all right now
i'm going to otherwise you're going to
have to mill around here and you can
look in these rooms and you can sort of
see how rich
i am i'm very rich and powerful and
by the way i have spectacular taste in
art
um just the same um and now i'm gonna
socially upgrade you
you guys are now my friends so
congratulations
um and i'm gonna take you through here
come on
come on in and we're we're good friends
and i'm going to be hosting
yes you both are my friends now come on
um and we're going to well
i'm tied to a court here we're going to
go over here and we're going to have
dinner
um and actually sorry romans would never
walk on the grass because grass is gross
um you walk around here and i'm talking
and i'm telling you about this sculpture
i picked this up in greece and
for the sake of speed i'm going to come
over here all right so we're going to
have a dinner and we're going to look
out here
so come on into the triclinium let's see
i think this is technically an oicus but
whatever
and we're going to look and this is
going to be our view all right so we're
going to talk about
the r and we're going to talk about
politics and who we're going to backstab
and feed to the praetorian guards next
um and now um
ryan you are not my best friend and
you're not
in this conspiracy to kill caesar so
you're gonna stay here and janette you
can come with me
into an even more private room
over here which is very nice and very
impressive ryan you can actually come if
you want
um yeah don't you feel not as special um
and so in here jeanette feels so
special and she's also seen that i am so
incredible look at my house
this is gorgeous and she and i we are
special friends and we know because
we're in the same space together
and it's private no one else is going to
come in here and we're going to plot the
assassination of caesar
and it's great because you look around
here and you're like well liz must know
what she's talking about
i'm going to kill a dictator with her
and
yeah i'm very successful i'm very
powerful i got a lot of money i have a
weird
rabbit mosaic um that's
how the roman house is set up right this
does not
function like in a like an american
house right like an american house where
we're all about the privacy and you have
like
this is the kitchen this is the dining
room this is the living room
um i'm gonna change what i'm doing in a
room
based on my personal needs
uh and i'm gonna have different rooms
that i can use for
pretty much what we would consider the
same purpose so i might be willing to
meet with jeanette in here
but you ryan you're just like a pathetic
client so
i'm going to come back out here geez
what do you
want oh my god these clients and i'm
just going to meet you
like in here all right hi i'm over here
okay uh i'm in here and so
like this is not as nice you don't feel
as special
right you are not as good as jeanette
you've escorted me here
after the decision that i'm not worthy
right right so i you're not gonna get to
come in
so that i can use this space for a
meeting or i can use that space for a
meeting or that space like there's all
these different spaces i can use
and i control the social energy and i
control the social relationships just by
which room
we're standing in it's a very dynamic
social
structure
well it's also interesting because you
can and actually i'm sort of getting
this as i'm role-playing here in that
you can modify it in the moment like i
could meet you
jeanette here and be like no come with
me
let's let's be better friends let's go
this way over here and if things are
going well it can be
like you know what now we're better
friends let's let's go here as opposed
to
a very static social dynamic that's
already fixed
does that correlate to how far you're
inviting them into the house as to
how much trust there is in that
relationship how much you're approving
of them
and wanting to invite them into your
exactly to
assassinate yes and they're very aware
of this right so it must be a very tense
thing if i say the wrong thing
i'm going to get escorted to as part of
a house where
i'm not i don't feel as important does
it make for kind of a more like
tenth like i want to please you at all
times so i can be
you know kept in exactly it's a way for
me to signal
instantly to you in this case my social
inferiors
how i'm feeling like if you come and you
say like
i'd like right like so if you come in
and you say i want to invest
in i don't know this merchant ship
that's going to thieves and i'm like
uh-huh then that is one reaction but if
i'm like oh
come on in here let's talk let's talk
more in this more private space about
thebes
this is like a physical motion for you
to understand but like yes i am
approving
um i am interacting with you in a
positive way or
if i say like yeah no you're not going
farther than this you're just
you're done here then you physically
know that like oh
i don't approve without you needing to
say that because there's sort of social
tension
and just outright saying i don't approve
of you
you but it's sort of a social
expectation and norm
right and understood that well
and another nice thing is that this is
useful so brian if you're here
and i'm talking with jeanette you don't
necessarily know my relationship with
jeanette right because you don't maybe
know her
right but she's just another client but
if i say like hey jeanette
come with me you can watch me
approve of jeanette and bring jeanette
or if you see jeanette already in there
in the triclinium you know
i like jeanette better than i like you
because you're over here and she's over
there
okay um so if it wasn't it was a
conversation you might not hear me
say i love your idea about fees
right because you can't hear that but
you can watch me and jeanette go like
this
and you're like ah he might be well it's
like he always he must have liked
jeanette's idea about things
okay remind me when we were standing at
the door and you were standing there
and you invited us in sort of initially
so that's like a first contact we're
just meeting you
and that's as far as you would let us go
initially and we know that and we expect
that
and we right so this is a this is a
waiting space
um so you're gonna hear my client
like if we already have a legal
relationship you're gonna be able to
just like mill around in here anytime
you want basically this is open space
um and then i'll call you in here like
if you think about this as a waiting
room and this is like an
office i'll say like ryan i'll see you
now jeanette i'll see you now
um well yeah it's a very nice waiting
room
and there would have been chess all
around in here
of valuables so that i could see it
you you could wait around and be like
wow he's got a lot of chess he must be
really wealthy
it's all about the power display and was
this a bath
or a pool or no it's a pool
it's a pool slash water catchment area
it's the main water source of the house
so the main water source is going to be
rain coming through here falling into
here and if this was
accurate which it's not there would be a
hole
that drains into a major cistern that
takes up a good percentage of the
floor span of the house underneath
so would nests be allowed here or was it
just residents
or both or boats
i mean this is huge normally it's a much
smaller area
but what's interesting rain clouds and
rain from this spot right here that
would be really
cool yeah did they drink this water
or yes i mean not out of here they would
there would be a well generally
someplace else in the house
that they would pull the water out of
the cistern no no no from
here from the cistern but they wouldn't
like lap it up
out of the impluvium they would um
they would draw it from someplace else
yeah
okay now the system it would like kill
the system the cistern is like all
under the house and so probably
somewhere back in here um
depending on the size of the house
there's going to be a well there's a
bathroom
that they can pull up that's a bathroom
this is like a bath in here it's kind of
dark
yeah um yeah
this bath in here but yep is there a
kitchen generally not in a house this
size
there might have been um but mostly
people are
took in the peristyle or in the atrium
or outside in the yard
because a it's super hot and b
it's for dangerous um to have an open
flame in a building like this um when
you cook on an open fire like actually
cook not like you're barbecuing
like a hot dog you're going to get to
you need heat of about like
400 450 degrees um so you don't want to
have to be in an enclosed space with
that you also have the smoke
contamination um and so
um before like i don't know the dates
exactly but like before
1920 or something like that or
1890 the second leading cause of death
for
for women after childbirth and
complications thereof
uh was fire from catching your skirts in
the
in the fires so you really don't want to
have a kitchen and if it's a big enough
build
house that it has a kitchen first of all
you're really looking at something along
the lines of like
closer to downton abbey than like your
or my house
where they need a kitchen because
they're just they're serving so many
people
all the time and they generally were
probably used
mostly as ovens or um
like storage places as opposed to like
i'm gonna cook
a six course meal in here because you
just bring the house down
and that would be good i see
so very cool
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dei-food-for-thoughttrue1627564893422tlmasonJessica Alexander, Instructional Design Consultant, Center for Teaching and Learning at IUPUISelf-paced online resources focused on teaching and learningSelf-paced online resources focused on teaching and learningIncrease diversity, equity, and inclusion in your courses/articles/2020-year-end/dei-food-for-thoughtIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/dei-food-for-thoughtwittmann1606243222198sjengel1607009256002column_namefood_for_thoughtshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblmbanner_desktop.jpgRoad overpass on the IUPUI campus painted with the words, Discrimination has no place here.1596821800600/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblmbanner_tablet.jpgRoad overpass on the IUPUI campus painted with the words, Discrimination has no place here.64621768512/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblmbanner_mobile.jpgRoad overpass on the IUPUI campus painted with the words, Discrimination has no place here.54125768512///Left
Increase diversity, equity, and inclusion in your courses
A selection of self-paced online resources and readings that focus on teaching and learning/Crimson
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Jessica Alexander
h2FullOne HalfInstructional Design Consultant, Center for Teaching and Learning at IUPUI

Not wanting to add to the burdens of our BIPOC colleagues, many of us have set out to better educate ourselves on how to be an anti-racist. The foundations of a DEI education have been well covered in other venues (like this CEW&T webinar by Dr. Nicki Washington), but where can we look for teaching and learning focused resources that touch on technology?

On the heels of the ATLT conference—which itself featured a great and highly relevant keynote session (log in to the ATLT Kaltura channel to watch a recording)—CTL's Jessica Alexander pulled together a selection of self-paced online resources and readings. We'd love to hear from you if you know of more.

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Self-paced online resources
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IU Expand courses: Improving the Accessibility of your Canvas course and Creating an Accessible Syllabus using Microsoft Word

Accessible documents and Canvas course sites make information easier to find and use for students of all abilities. These self-paced courses will show you how to use accessibility checkers in Canvas and Microsoft Word to fix inaccessible content.

Center for Urban Education Syllabus Review Guide

Racial unrest has highlighted the institutional racism that people of color experience on a daily basis and the importance of educating ourselves in antiracist practices. As instructors, we have a responsibility to develop courses that are equitable and anti-racist, beginning with the syllabus. This syllabus review guide provides a framework for you to review your syllabi through a race-conscious lens to identify areas that can be leveraged to promote racial equity. You will need to create a free account to view the guide.

Inclusive Teaching Guide – Dewsbury and Brame (2019)

This evidence-based teaching guide emphasizes the importance of developing self-awareness and empathy for students prior to implementing inclusive teaching strategies. Additionally, the guide describes several practices for fostering an inclusive classroom climate and pedagogical choices, with summaries of articles to support these practices. An instructor checklist with actionable steps is also included, so you can readily incorporate these practices into your courses.

The Peralta Equity Rubric for Online Courses

If you're teaching a course that is hybrid or fully online, then you can use this rubric to self-assess your courses and make your students' online learning experiences more equitable. The rubric includes criteria for addressing students' access to technology and other types of support, addressing bias, increasing the visibility of the instructor's commitment to inclusion and equity, and universal design for learning.

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BlackInTheIvory

Explore this Twitter thread to learn how Black academics navigate challenges and barriers concerning racism in academia.

Unpacking Teachers' Invisible Knapsacks: Social Identity and Privilege in Higher Education – Barnett (2013)

Pamela Barnett builds on Peggy McIntosh's article on white privilege to consider how other identities may impact the experiences of students and instructors in higher education. You can use the lists to consider the various privileges that you may hold and use that awareness to inform your pedagogy.

How to Respond to Coronavirus Racism

Since the start of the pandemic, there has been an increase in racism and xenophobia targeted to Asians and Asian Americans, including comments on our campuses and in our courses. It is critical that we effectively address these comments, so all of our students have a sense of belonging. This article describes a four-step process that you can use to speak up against bias, including specific phrases that you can use.

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diy-document-cameratrue1627564893422tlmasonThe Collaboration Technologies teamCreate your own DIY document camera using technology you have at handCreate your own DIY document camera using technology you have at handShare handwritten content in Zoom/articles/2020-year-end/diy-document-cameraIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/diy-document-camerawittmann1606242685149mkelmer1606936302403column_namehow_to_techshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-year-end/doccam_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/doccam_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofdoccam_desktop.jpg728031800600/images/2020-year-end/doccam_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/doccam_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofdoccam_tablet.jpgExtreme close-up for a mobile phone being used to photograph a document388061200400/images/2020-year-end/doccam_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/doccam_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofdoccam_mobile.jpgExtreme close-up for a mobile phone being used to photograph a document34848768512///Left
Share handwritten content in Zoom
Create your own DIY document camera using technology you have at hand/Crimson
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Thanks to the UITS Collaboration Technologies team, the IU Knowledge Base has practical, step-by-step instructions for creating a remote setup that's closer to what you might have had on campus—and doesn't necessarily require new devices. Below is just one example.

If you have a touch-enabled device like a tablet or touchscreen laptop, then you can take advantage of online whiteboard or collaboration tools to share freehand drawings and handwritten text (learn more here). But you can also share this content using an external webcam or even your smartphone camera. Here's how.

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External webcam
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If you have a second external USB webcam, you can use it as a makeshift document camera:

  1. Connect the webcam to your computer.
  2. On your computer, connect to your Zoom meeting.
  3. In Zoom, choose Share Screen. When prompted to select what you want to share, click the Advanced tab, select Content from 2nd Camera, and click Share.
  4. Position a sheet of paper on a nearby surface, and place your webcam on a box or stand pointing at the paper. Make sure the entire paper is visible in the camera shot.
  5. Common issues:
    • If you see the video from your computer's main webcam instead of the external webcam, click Switch Camera in the top left of your Zoom window.
    • If the camera image appears upside down or sideways, open the drop-down menu next to the video icon in the Zoom toolbar. Choose Video Settings, then click Rotate 90° until the image appears right-side up.
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Smartphone camera
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If you do not have an external USB webcam, you can instead use your smartphone's camera as a document camera. You will need to join your Zoom meeting from both your computer and your phone.

  1. Connect to your Zoom meeting from your computer. Turn on your microphone, and start your video if you want your students to see your face.
  2. Make sure your smartphone is connected to your local Wi-Fi network. Join your Zoom meeting from your phone. Do not turn on the microphone, and turn the volume on your phone all the way down.
  3. In the Zoom app on your phone, select Start Video to turn on the phone's camera. Tap the Switch Camera icon (a camera outline with circular arrows) to switch to the front-facing camera. Physically rotate your phone so that the Zoom app appears in landscape orientation.
  4. Position a sheet of paper on a nearby surface, and place your phone on a box or stand with the camera pointing at the paper. Make sure the entire paper is visible in the camera shot.
  5. On your computer, you will see the video from your phone in a small pane at the top of the Zoom window. Click the ellipsis (...) in the upper right of that pane to open an options menu. Click Spotlight Video to prominently display the video from your phone to all participants; for more on spotlighting, see Spotlight Video.
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For help sharing handwritten content in Zoom meetings, contact UITS Collaboration Technologies at or (812) 856-2020.

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diy-lightboardtrue1627564893422tlmasonSteve EgyhaziCreate a lightboard in less than 30 minutes for under $150 to personalize your videosHow to create a lightboard in under 30 minutes for less than $150Build your own lightboard for more engaging online classes/articles/2020-year-end/diy-lightboardIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/diy-lightboardwittmann1606241270572sjengel1607006151928column_namelighter_sideshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflightboard_desktop.jpgTwo smiling women, one of whom is writing on a lightboard901641800600/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflightboard_tablet.jpgTwo smiling women, one of whom is writing on a lightboard486861200400/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflightboard_mobile.jpgTwo smiling women, one of whom is writing on a lightboard55719768512///Right
Build your own lightboard for more engaging online classes
Create a lightboard in less than 30 minutes for under $150 to personalize your videos/Crimson
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If you've never seen one, a lightboard is basically a piece of plexiglass that has an LED strip attached to the edge of it: When you write on it, the text appears to glow in mid-air. The Lightboard setup lets you illustrate lessons with a diagram or explain a formula without blocking the written content with your body or turning your back to your students.

Alex Hollingsworth, an assistant professor at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA), built one himself and published the results on YouTube:

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Use Open Broadcast Studio (OBS) to enhance the look of your recorded or live lectures
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Want to do more with OBS than flip the camera image for your DIY lightboard? Collaboration Technologies’ Steve Egyhazi created a video that walks you through the basics, plus a special camera effect -- called the "circle crop" -- that will make you look like a pro.

Professional streamers and social media influencers use OBS to create TV-style transitions and effects for their online programming. The results you can achieve are only limited by your imagination, but the interface is daunting at first (so start by watching Steve's video).

Download OBS here.

Bonus download: Get the PNG graphic Steve used for the circle crop.

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there's been a lot of talk about light
boards recently we've done something on
our podcast about it
i want to make my own so i'm recording
online classes
particularly my statistics class i i can
make it a little more
engaging for students i want to see how
fast i can make it though
so my daughter just sat down for a nap
see if i can make one in 30 minutes so
i'm gonna go ahead and get started
i changed a little bit and put out all
the materials earlier today
but i will now move to my sort of
construction area and see how fast i can
make it
all right so i'm now in my uh area i'm
going to be setting this up
and give you a little bit of an idea of
everything that we have here
the camera so here we've got
the led light strip a couple clips
black uh background piece of plexiglas
table for everything to sit on this is
gonna be
what i'm actually holding this webcam
right now i'm gonna put the webcam on
here
a microphone some clamps
and way too many markers so all this was
recommended by justin ross and my other
people
we're going to see how long it takes to
put together
and i will stop moving this camera
around right now
all right now we have a clear shade of
plexiglass
seems like we're almost the way there
power supply for the led strips
get a level
i think we're in a better position to
apply this tape
i have some of these adhesive hooks
morgan
to just camera
bear with me a moment
okay so we have
three minutes to go we're basically
there didn't have a good
stand for this thing
so i think i obviously need a little bit
more light on me
that's pretty cool so
you can see how this might be really
useful
our statistics classes or
all sorts of other things
obviously there's a few smudges on the
board but
overall i have to say i'm pretty excited
about how fast and easy this was to set
up
um thank you sebastian and emily
also thank you justin ross who put a uh
link in these notes to our podcast
episode
see what some of the colors look like
and obviously as i'm writing this this
is backwards
but uh you can pretty easily uh reverse
this
uh using video editing software and
maybe a little quicker
and it looks like we did it all with uh
a minute to spare thanks everybody
you
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Hollingsworth co-hosts a podcast called the Hidden Curriculum, which explores issues important for professional success that are not typically taught in grad school. Inspired by podcast guest Emily Nix, he decided to try to make a lightboard as quickly and cheaply as he could.

He was able to create one in under 30 minutes for less than $150, with guidance from SPEA colleagues Coady Wing and Justin Ross. Purchase list (via Justin Ross):

Open Broadcast Studio (OBS), free software for video recording and live streaming with Windows or Mac, can be an important component of a home lightboard setup. OBS allows you to flip the camera image horizontally, so what you write on the plexiglass lightboard appears correctly (not backward) on the viewer's screen. Here's how:

  1. In the OBS Scenes menu, add a new scene called Flip Prep.
  2. In the Sources menu, add a source to the Flip Prep scene: Video Capture Device, and choose the camera you are using with your lightboard setup.
  3. In the OBS Scenes menu, add a new scene called Flip Final.
  4. In the Sources menu, add a Source to the Flip Final scene: Scene, and choose the Flip Prep scene.
  5. In the Scenes menu, click to select the Flip Final scene, right-click on the camera image you see in the preview area, select Transform > Flip Horizontal.

Bonus: You can also modify the camera image's brightness, contrast, saturation, etc:

  1. In the Scenes menu, click to select the Flip Final scene, right click on the camera image you see in the preview area, select Filters.
  2. In the Filters menu, click the + icon and select "Color Correction." Drag the Brightness, Saturation, Contrast sliders as you look at the camera image in the preview area till you like what you see.
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icymitrue1627564893422tlmasonvarious sourcesStay in the know about tech news and online teaching resources from around IU.Tech news from around IUICYMI/articles/2020-year-end/icymiIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/icymiwittmann1606829055272sjengel1607007031825column_nameicymishort-display-nameICYMIalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_possibility_desktop.jpgIUPUI winter scene11240791800600/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_possibility_tablet.jpgIUPUI winter scene5645731200400/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_possibility_mobile.jpgIUPUI winter scene106253768512///Left
In Case You Missed It
Recent news about teaching and learning with technology/Crimson
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In Case You Missed It
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Submit a proposal for the 2021 E.C. Moore Symposium on Excellence in Teaching
Share your ideas and methods for creating better learning experiences, and network with others interested in doing the same

Submit a proposal for the 2021 Statewide Summit on Women & Tech
The Summit provides an opportunity to celebrate women & technology and to share, learn, engage with, and experience tech

Mosaic Initiative year-end round-up
Some of the ways we rethought campus spaces to answer the very real health challenges presented by this pandemic

Being proactive about Zoombombing turns into a group effort
Cybersecurity center and UITS take extra steps to protect IU students, faculty, and staff

Safety of in-person courses at Indiana University supported by new analysis
Data shows no evidence of increased COVID-19 risk with classes taught in person

From the LT list: New online teaching and learning resources
IU's teaching and learning centers have developed two new series to help with teaching online, in person, or a mix. And a new Pressbook, "Zoom to the Next Level: Active Learning in the Virtual Classroom," offers tips for keeping things fresh. Subscribe to the LT list for more like this.

Top Hat: Hybrid attendance feature
Top Hat now lets a student report whether they are attending class in person or online

Virtual access to STC computer labs
Even while your students are away from campus, they can continue to access  specialized software and high-powered computing through IUanyWare

Ask the Expert: 5 tips for delivering your best 'elevator speech' about your research
Even simple-sounding questions can be tough to answer succinctly. IU experts like Tatiana Kolovou can help.

Mosaic Initiative celebrates its fifth anniversary
IU's active learning program is a model for higher education across the nation

Rob Lowden takes the helm
A Navy veteran with decades of tech leadership at IU, Lowden quickly finds his sea legs as new vice president for IT and chief information officer

Introducing SecureMyResearch
New service helps researchers protect their data and comply with cybersecurity requirements

Going remote: IU releases findings from survey on spring 2020 eLearning
Four main recommendations will help faculty plan for continued remote instruction in face of COVID-19 pandemic

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indextrue1627564893422tlmasonWinter 2020: Do it yourself (DIY) issue of The Connected Professor.Summer 2020: Back to school/articles/2020-year-end/indexIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/indextlmason1617110771998tlmason1617110771998short-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idThe Connected Professor: Fall 2019 EditionA fresh look at teaching and learning technology at IU./images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgibau_large.jpggibau_large.jpgGina Sánchez Gibau standing on the IUPUI campus.1187651800600The Connected Professor: Fall 2019 EditionA fresh look at teaching and learning technology at IU./images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgibau_large.jpggibau_large.jpgGina Sánchez Gibau standing on the IUPUI campus.1187651800600Text Overlay/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_banner.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_banner.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblm_mural_banner.jpgBlack Lives Matter street mural on north side of IUPUI campus. Photo by Indiana University photographer Liz Kaye.3007791800600/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblm_mural_tablet.jpgBlack Lives Matter street mural on north side of IUPUI campus. Photo by Indiana University photographer Liz Kaye.1444261200400/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blm_mural_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblm_mural_mobile.jpgBlack Lives Matter street mural on north side of IUPUI campus. Photo by Indiana University photographer Liz Kaye.109417768512///Left
If not now, then when?
Developing a first year seminar with lasting lessons about race, diversity, and communityRead more/articles/2020-year-end/if-not-now-then-whencolumn_namefeatureshort-display-nameIf not now, then when?alternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/if-not-now-then-whenIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofif-not-now-then-whenIf not now, then when?Developing a first year seminar with lasting lessons about race, diversity, and communitySarah EngelDeveloping a first year seminar with lasting lessons about race, diversity, and communityLight Gray
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2020-year-end/supporting-pervasive-teaching-excellencecolumn_nametaking_noteshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/supporting-pervasive-teaching-excellenceIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsupporting-pervasive-teaching-excellenceSupporting Pervasive Teaching ExcellenceSharing best practices in teaching and learningMichael MorroneBest practices in teaching and learningwidecontent-left/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproftakingnote_mmorrone_desktop.jpgMichael Morrone1186001800600/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproftakingnote_mmorrone_tablet.jpgMichael Morrone636141200400/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/takingnote_mmorrone_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproftakingnote_mmorrone_mobile.jpgMichael Morrone59177768512/articles/2020-year-end/happenings-winter-2020column_namehappeningsshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/happenings-winter-2020IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings-winter-2020Happenings Winter 2020Join us for year-end and early 2021 eventsSarah EngelWinter 2020 event listingsnarrowcontent-right/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofswit_25in21_banner_register_desktop.jpgA speaker making a presentation in front of a large audience and the Statewide IT 2021 logo2313961800600/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofswit_25in21_banner_register_tablet.jpgA speaker making a presentation in front of a large audience and the Statewide IT 2021 logo1231091200400/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/swit_25in21_banner_register_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofswit_25in21_banner_register_mobile.jpgA speaker making a presentation in front of a large audience and the Statewide IT 2021 logo54645768512/_custom-sections/2020-year-end/layout2IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflayout2Text
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2020-year-end/teaching-with-and-in-virtual-realitycolumn_namefeatureshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/teaching-with-and-in-virtual-realityIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofteaching-with-and-in-virtual-realityTeaching with and in virtual realityReal-life advantages that go well beyond the wow factorJeannette LehrUsing VR in the remote learning classroomfullcontent-right/images/2020-year-end/vr_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/vr_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofvr_desktop.jpgInstructor wearing a VR headset and a screen of what she's seeing; students watch from semicircular seating.1443271800600/images/2020-year-end/vr_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/vr_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofvr_tablet.jpgInstructor wearing a VR headset and a screen of what she's seeing; students watch from semicircular seating.712461200400/images/2020-year-end/vr_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/vr_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofvr_mobile.jpgInstructor wearing a VR headset and a screen of what she's seeing; students watch from semicircular seating.61423768512/_custom-sections/2020-year-end/layout3IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflayout3Text
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2020-year-end/dei-food-for-thoughtcolumn_namefood_for_thoughtshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/dei-food-for-thoughtIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofdei-food-for-thoughtIncrease diversity, equity, and inclusion in your coursesSelf-paced online resources focused on teaching and learningJessica Alexander, Instructional Design Consultant, Center for Teaching and Learning at IUPUISelf-paced online resources focused on teaching and learningnarrowcontent-left/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblmbanner_desktop.jpgRoad overpass on the IUPUI campus painted with the words, Discrimination has no place here.1596821800600/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblmbanner_tablet.jpgRoad overpass on the IUPUI campus painted with the words, Discrimination has no place here.64621768512/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/blmbanner_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofblmbanner_mobile.jpgRoad overpass on the IUPUI campus painted with the words, Discrimination has no place here.54125768512/articles/2020-year-end/diy-document-cameracolumn_namehow_to_techshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/diy-document-cameraIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofdiy-document-cameraShare handwritten content in ZoomCreate your own DIY document camera using technology you have at handThe Collaboration Technologies teamCreate your own DIY document camera using technology you have at handwidecontent-left/images/2020-year-end/doccam_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/doccam_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofdoccam_desktop.jpg728031800600/images/2020-year-end/doccam_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/doccam_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofdoccam_tablet.jpgExtreme close-up for a mobile phone being used to photograph a document388061200400/images/2020-year-end/doccam_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/doccam_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofdoccam_mobile.jpgExtreme close-up for a mobile phone being used to photograph a document34848768512/_custom-sections/2020-year-end/layout4IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflayout4Text
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2020-year-end/diy-lightboardcolumn_namelighter_sideshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/diy-lightboardIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofdiy-lightboardBuild your own lightboard for more engaging online classesCreate a lightboard in less than 30 minutes for under $150 to personalize your videosSteve EgyhaziHow to create a lightboard in under 30 minutes for less than $150widecontent-left/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflightboard_desktop.jpgTwo smiling women, one of whom is writing on a lightboard901641800600/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflightboard_tablet.jpgTwo smiling women, one of whom is writing on a lightboard486861200400/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/lightboard_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflightboard_mobile.jpgTwo smiling women, one of whom is writing on a lightboard55719768512/articles/2020-year-end/icymicolumn_nameicymishort-display-nameICYMIalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-year-end/icymiIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymiICYMIStay in the know about tech news and online teaching resources from around IU.various sourcesTech news from around IUnarrow-/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_possibility_desktop.jpgIUPUI winter scene11240791800600/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_possibility_tablet.jpgIUPUI winter scene5645731200400/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-year-end/icymi_possibility_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi_possibility_mobile.jpgIUPUI winter scene106253768512/_custom-sections/2020-year-end/layout5IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflayout5Text
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2020-summertrue1597758487529tlmasonSummer 2020/articles/2020-summerIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summertlmason1596463203258tlmason1596463203258issue-titleBack to schoolshort-display-nameSummer 2020alternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonesurvey-saystrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelStrategies, resources, and support for teaching and learning in the midst of uncertaintyDiscover actionable items and detailed strategies regarding how to implement recommendations from the IU eLearning Research and Practice Lab "Going Remote" spring 2020 survey of IU students and faculty. Survey says: Four recommendations/articles/2020-summer/survey-saysIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/survey-saysmkelmer1596476729913tlmason1597767795790column_namefeatureshort-display-nameSurvey saysalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-summer/survey_says_desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/survey_says_desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsurvey_says_desktop.pngA male student and a female student walking on campus wearing masks26547981800600/images/2020-summer/leadership_tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/leadership_tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadership_tablet.pngPhoto of Learning Spaces team experiencing a virtual reality roller coaster12639971200400/images/2020-summer/survey_says_mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/survey_says_mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsurvey_says_mobile.pngA male student and a female student walking on campus wearing masks985101768512///Left
Survey says: Four recommendations
Strategies, resources, and support for teaching and learning in the midst of uncertainty/Crimson
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IU's eLearning Research and Practice Lab
h2FullOne HalfActionable insights from the student and faculty surveys about going remote

With the goal of providing actionable insights, the lab's preliminary findings lay out four main recommendations to guide future planning. Here we take things a step further, detailing strategies, resources, and support that can help you figure out what to do with these recommendations.

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What are clear learning goals?
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Learning goals lay out your expectations for students — what's vital in the course, what they should be able to do at the end of the course, and how to assess their progress along the way. But how do you make them clear?

Be specific, measurable, and learner-centered (meaning focused on student actions, or what they should spend their time practicing and studying). Both course- and assignment-level learning goals should be outcomes-based, focusing on what students should be able to do afterward.

Learn more about developing clear learning goals. The Teaching for Student Success series also has a related module. To get there, enroll in the course if you haven't already, go to Modules and then to Module 1: Course Design, and explore the "What do I need to know about learning outcomes?" section.

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Recommendation 1: Assign classwork judiciously and in alignment with clear learning goals
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73% of students agreed that it took more effort to complete their assigned work after the transition to remote instruction, and many reported high anxiety due to ballooning numbers of deadlines and assignments.

Most students responding to the study reported increases in coursework volume, and in the effort required to complete it, paired with a decrease in their understanding of the course's learning goals. In open-ended comments, there were also many references to "busy work."

Strategies, resources, and support

On the Keep Teaching website, IU teaching center consultants recommend one assignment per week (posted and submitted via Canvas) that:

  • Connects to module and course objectives
  • Situates relevance to students' lives/careers (answers the question, "Why are we doing this?")
  • Provides a clear process/task list
  • Articulates expectations for learning outcomes

This kind of transparency will help students better understand your expectations and the purpose of specific coursework. Clear communication is critical — in your syllabus, assignments, and assessments. (In the following sections, Recommendations 2 and 3 provide suggestions about using excellent communication to ensure students get the interactivity and feedback they need.)

For a deeper dive, read Dr. Katie Linder's Blended Course Design Workbook (online at IUCAT) — featured in this issue's Food for Thought column — or her book on High-Impact Practices in Online Education.

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In this issue
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Recommendation 2: Create opportunities for student-instructor communication, especially for first- and second-year students
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During the spring period of remote instruction, instructors became the primary lifeline between IU and its students. However, 67% of instructors agreed that they felt disconnected from their students, and 74% of students agreed that they'd lost touch with the Indiana University community.

Strategies, resources, and support

As the instructor, you set the tone of communication for the entire class, both in-person and online. Communicating regularly and meaningfully makes the difference between an engaged and a disengaged student. Listening is also essential to creating an atmosphere of trust and mutual understanding, so you know when your students are confused, overwhelmed — or happily learning!

The Keep Teaching website recommends several ways to open lines of communication between yourself, the in-person students, and the online students at the start of each class session — along with suggested ways to be more present outside of regularly scheduled class periods. Check in regularly with your students to find out what kinds of activities work best for them and how you can improve.

For additional ideas, check out Keep Teaching's strategies for communication and building community:

  • How can I create and maintain a sense of community in my course?
  • How can I hold online office hours?
  • How can I keep students engaged during a Zoom class session?
  • How can I use student feedback to adjust my course throughout the semester?
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Keep it simple: Use Canvas
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Canvas Announcements can provide timely reminders — and also help recap, reinforce, and clarify essential ideas from class activities and discussions. They can also help you be more present for your students, increasing their engagement.

Canvas Discussions can help you meaningfully engage with students, guiding them toward the most important aspects of course content. Referring to specific discussion threads and their authors during class can help underscore the value and utility of these discussions.

Also, if you post all assignments and deadlines in Canvas (even when an assignment is completed outside Canvas), your students can make use of the Canvas To-Do list or Boost to stay organized and manage their time effectively.

To make things even more transparent, consider creating a single page of all assignment due dates for the course, and post it prominently within your Canvas course site.


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You could tell the instructors who really cared and tried their best to make sure students were learning the material despite all that was going on. The evident care of those few instructors, going out of their way to maintain clarity, [was] truly helpful and appreciated.

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Recommendation 3: Facilitate student success and foster a sense of virtual community through student-to-student communication
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When students noted that discussions were a primary aspect of their classwork (without distinction of whether these were synchronous or asynchronous), they also reported increased success and better outcomes. However, only 33% of students reported that such discussions were a primary aspect of their classes after the transition to remote instruction.

Strategies, resources, and support

To facilitate community, improve engagement, and reduce isolation, it's also essential to provide more opportunities for students to interact with each other. Activities that encourage interaction with peers can help students construct meaning from the course content. As one student responded in the survey, "With online learning, I wasn't able to benefit from other students asking questions during class and creating discussion, which always helped me to understand the material better."

On the Keep Teaching website, IU teaching center consultants recommend using all of the tools at your disposal to get students engaging with one another synchronously and asynchronously. Here are four fundamental approaches to maximizing student-to-student interaction:

  1. If possible, have the students in the class visible to those online and vice-versa.
  2. Try to organize class time around rich learning experiences in which students are actively engaged with one another.
  3. Use Zoom breakout rooms so online students can participate in group work at the same time as in-person students.
  4. Use cloud software for collaborative work.

For additional ideas, check out Keep Teaching's strategies for interactivity and student collaboration (which touch on topics like facilitating group work, discussions in Zoom, and peer review).

Approaching things from a student's perspective, Keep Learning offers a range of tips for online learning. Emphasizing communication with instructors, these practical tips are framed as strategies for success, for self-care, and for staying connected even in times of isolation.

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Recommendation 4: Collaborate with other members of IU's vibrant teaching community by sharing materials and successes, and providing venues for others to do the same
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90% of instructors agreed with the statement, "I created my own instructional materials," and 68.13% agreed with the statement, "I was willing to freely share the materials I created with others." However, only 29% agreed with the statement, "I asked others to share their instructional materials with me."

As one instructor noted in their open-ended comments, "I might have benefitted from a repository of successful online assignments and activities that help monitor student engagement and understanding, especially if the repository was discipline-specific. It might have been easier to adapt colleagues' assignments (that they were willing to share) to my own course, instead of feeling like each of us was trying to reinvent the wheel."

Strategies, resources, and support

To reframe the student-focused statement from the previous recommendation: To facilitate community, improve engagement, and reduce isolation, it's also important to provide more opportunities for instructors to interact with each other. Collaboration with colleagues could become one of the main ways in which course content is meaningfully constructed by faculty, especially during times of transition when a coordinated approach might help mitigate increased responsibilities.

To this end, a group of IU faculty has created a Teaching Online Community of Practice — for details, contact Adam Maksl, IU faculty fellow for eLearning Design & Innovation. Also consider joining the Higher Ed Learning Collective, an effort spearheaded by IU's Erika Biga Lee. Your campus teaching center can also be an excellent resource for engaging with colleagues, both on your own campus and across the entire university.

Learn more about finding, curating, and delivering others' content on Keep Teaching — and be sure to make use of the Canvas Commons at IU for finding relevant course material from other instructors and sharing your materials like courses, assignments, modules, discussions, pages, and quizzes. Also, if you've done more online teaching, sharing your materials on a departmental Canvas site could go a long way toward helping colleagues figure out how to construct their courses.

Teaching during a pandemic can limit many of your usual, informal avenues of communication. Each week, make sure course content aligns with clear learning goals, create opportunities to interact with your students, and encourage them to engage with one another and find ways to collaborate (and possibly commiserate) with colleagues, so you have the support you need.

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Call to Action
Learn more about the IU eLearning Research and Practice Lab
h3FullOne Half-/-////-/-TopLeft///Standard/part of IU's Pervasive Technology Institute, with support from UITS Learning Technologies/https://pti.iu.edu/centers/d2i/initiatives/elearning-research-lab.html/YesStandard/HTML
rollercoastertrue1627564893422tlmasonJulie JohnstonBehind the scenes with Director Julie Johnston and the Learning Spaces team as they prepare for the fall 2020 semester.Behind the scenes with Director Julie Johnston and the Learning Spaces team as they prepare for the fall 2020 semester.The COVID-19 rollercoaster/articles/2020-summer/rollercoasterIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/rollercoastermkelmer1596483787985tlmason1597756867734column_nametaking_noteshort-display-nameThe COVID-19 rollercoasteralternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-summer/leadership_desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/leadership_desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadership_desktop.pngPhoto of Learning Spaces team experiencing a virtual reality roller coaster28437051800600/images/2020-summer/leadership_tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/leadership_tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadership_tablet.pngPhoto of Learning Spaces team experiencing a virtual reality roller coaster12639971200400/images/2020-summer/leadership_mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/leadership_mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadership_mobile.pngPhoto of Learning Spaces team experiencing a virtual reality roller coaster1018205768512///Right
The COVID-19 rollercoaster
Behind the scenes with Director Julie Johnston and the Learning Spaces team as they prepare for the fall 2020 semester./Crimson
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Julie Johnston
h3FullOne HalfDirector of UITS Learning Spaces

For Julie Johnston and the Learning Spaces team, the past few months have all come to seem like a rollercoaster ride, but they're ready to support teaching and learning this fall — no matter what form it takes.

 

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In this issue
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For many years, I have participated in emergency management exercises to ensure we are ready for any type of situation that comes our way. If any of those practice scenarios had ever included what our university is currently facing, my response would have been "we won't ever have to deal with this."

If anyone would have described the rollercoaster ride we've all been on — moving to fully online instruction, then to a variety of in-person and online approaches, while anticipating new challenges — I would not have believed them. It's all come to seem like the ups and downs of a series of things we thought we'd never do.

March and April 2020

On March 30, IU conducted 7,946 online meetings/webinars. Nearly 28,000 participants connected online that day for 800,501 meeting minutes.

Back in March when we quickly pivoted online, we led the support of Zoom and Kaltura (lecture capture). We were nervous but excited, almost like we were launching a new startup company as we watched the numbers of users and sessions rise that first day after spring break.

We also launched Remote Desktop in the Student Technology Centers, so students could access the entire suite of specialized software (including discipline-specific collections like the IUPUI engineering build) through IUanyWare. We will continue building on this service to support distance and eLearning well into the future.

May 2020

The IU Classroom Database has grown from 500 or 600 entries to over 3,500 space records — including details like what kind of webcam or sound system is installed, as well as the social distancing capacity of the space.

When spring semester ended, we knew we couldn't rest easy. For well over 15 years, our Learning Spaces team has used a sophisticated classroom database (classrooms.iu.edu) to capture pertinent data on the classrooms we support. Over the years, we entertained the idea of offering this as the main repository for all spaces on every IU campus, but felt that the task was too monumental.

Due to the pandemic, the university needed to identify learning spaces on all campuses, and asked us to coordinate the effort. While we truly never believed it was possible, we have now reached over 3,500 records of spaces across IU's campuses (including departmental, residential, auxiliary, and general classrooms). This is an incredible opportunity for us to provide all campuses with detailed information on their many learning spaces.

June 2020

All IU campuses collaborated on a large volume order of audio/visual packages for classroom upgrades, including 500+ webcams and 700+ USB doc cams.

Meanwhile, we anxiously waited for the announcement about IU's plans for fall 2020. The Learning Spaces team also installs and supports the technology in most general inventory spaces, and we knew we'd need to act quickly … but toward what end? We began by first determining which technology is needed to teach a course where some students are in the classroom, and others are online.

We knew we'd be placing a sizable equipment order at a time of limited inventories and high demand. We felt victorious in placing an early large-scale order until we sent a call-out out to all departments to determine their needs, which well exceeded the order we had placed. With the mantra of "stay calm and pivot," we navigated an uncertain landscape to place another large-scale order, so departments and regional campuses also had the equipment necessary to ensure instructors could initiate Zoom calls, share content, and scale out audio to their online students.

July and August 2020

At IU Bloomington alone, the Learning Spaces team identified 21 auxiliary spaces, including in the IU Auditorium and Indiana Memorial Union, for classroom use.

But the story doesn't stop here. Because of the social distancing guidelines, the university needed to create new learning spaces in defined auxiliary spaces (now found in our new database). Once those spaces were identified, we jumped in to install sufficient technology for a quality experience for the instructor, onsite students, and online students. After receiving a variety of questions related to classroom technology, we also created a video modeling best practices (featured in this issue's "How to tech" column).

Needless to say, all of this has been a challenge, but I am completely astounded by the professionalism of my team. I cannot believe their ability to overcome insurmountable odds and meet goals I would have never thought attainable. With every new challenge, they rose to the occasion, stayed calm, and triumphed.

Even when the rollercoaster presented an unexpected drop, we knew we had enough momentum to rise to the challenge. We now have an extensive classroom database and an improved classroom support structure, which includes online chat and remote desktop assistance for our instructor stations. We are ready to support teaching and learning this fall — no matter what form it takes.

Most faculty have never personally met the amazing Learning Spaces team who work behind the scenes to make great spaces ready for great teaching. We care about the success of each and every class held at Indiana University. And we won't let a national pandemic stop us from supporting you and your students.

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happeningstrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelStay in the know about teaching and learning events at IU.Stay in the know about recent and upcoming teaching and learning events at IU.Happenings/articles/2020-summer/happeningsIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/happeningsmkelmer1596747744108tlmason1597754552906column_namehappeningsshort-display-nameHappeningsalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-summer/happenings_desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/happenings_desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_desktop.pngPhoto of man drinking coffee during a Zoom meeting23580491800600/images/2020-summer/survey_says_tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/survey_says_tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsurvey_says_tablet.pngA male student and a female student walking on campus wearing masks12045041200400/images/2020-summer/happenings_mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/happenings_mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_mobile.pngPhoto of man drinking coffee during a Zoom meeting839490768512///Right
Happenings
Stay in the know about teaching and learning events at IU./Crimson
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LT list messages include featured learning technologies and pilots, news and updates on various apps and tools, and upcoming events and opportunities.

Get guidance from KeepTeaching.IU

Teaching is different now, but we're here to support you along the way. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed our lives and how we communicate with and connect to our students.

Check in with your campus teaching and learning center

The centers provide consultations on IU pedagogical and instructional technologies. They're also the best-connected when it comes to knowing what's going on across campus.

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Teaching Online Essentials series
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Online Essentials webinars provide core information about putting courses online and are at the heart of the Teaching Online Preparation Series.

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Upcoming webinars from the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning (CITL)

  • Facilitating Online Courses
    Thursday, August 19, 10–11:15 a.m. ET (Register)
  • Online Course Support: An Introduction for Teaching Assistants and Support Staff
    Friday, August 28, noon–1:15 p.m. ET (Register)

Past webinars from CITL

  • 30,000-Foot Planning: Strategic Online Course Design
    Recording (50:21)
  • Preparing Your Fall 2020 Canvas Course with the IU Course Templates
    Recording (46:49)
  • Putting Your Course Content Online
    Recording (47:27)
  • Assessing Student Learning Online
    Recording (55:57)

Learn more and explore specialty webinars at https://citl.indiana.edu/fall2020/index.html#tops

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Diversity Education webinar series
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A three-part workshop series to assist IU faculty and staff with working towards making all areas of the university inclusive and equitable spaces.

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For more, including the Inclusive Campus Environment Toolkit, visit diversity.iu.edu.

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Box migration webinars
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Webinars to help you prepare for your individual file migration and using your new file storage service.

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Microsoft OneDrive at IU: Individual file management basics

Ready to unpack after the big move? Where are your boxes and how can you see what's in them? Plus share the contents? Watch this recording after your individual files have been migrated to your OneDrive account from Box at IU to learn how to find, organize, edit, and share your files.

Google at IU My Drive: Individual file management basics

Ready to unpack after the big move? Where are your boxes and how can you see what's in them? Plus share the contents? Watch this recording after your individual files have been moved to your My Drive account from Box at IU to learn how to find, organize, edit, and share your files on My Drive.

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IU Women in Cybersecurity Talk
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Join the Center of Excellence for Women & Technology and the Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research for our annual talk.

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September 24, noon–1 p.m. ET

Hear from Barbara Simons, board chair of Verified Voting, a member of the Board of Advisors of the U.S. Election Assistance Commission (appointed by Sen. Reid and reappointed by Sen. Schumer), and the co-author of the book, "Broken Ballots: Will Your Vote Count?." She has been a leader in technology policy issues for more than 40 years and co-authored numerous reports and studies on how to improve our voting systems.

For more details, visit https://events.iu.edu/cewit/view/event/event_id/133716

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Fourth Monday series
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Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP) Indiana hosts timely talks from colleagues from around the state.

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Impacting Inclusivity: How a certificate changed a campus

September 28, 12:30–1:30 p.m. ET
Elizabeth Osika & Mona Kheiry, Marian University

The data showed there were issues. A change was needed. But how do you get everyone to understand their role in building an inclusive community? To get people talking about uncomfortable issues? At Marian University, this was accomplished through an idea at a lunchroom table and a stack of certificates. This session will explain how this simple concept grew to something which is changing the entire campus culture.

More details at https://events.iu.edu/iukctla/view/event/event_id/108634

Increasing Empathy Utilizing Learner Experience Design

October 26, 12:30–1:30 p.m. ET
Christian Rogers, IUPUI

Learner experience design (LX) is a method of pedagogical development that takes into consideration the student at each step of the process. I will be presenting an overview of the method as well as discuss a recent workshop where faculty utilized the first steps of LX to interview students, develop empathy maps, and reframe an assignment in their course.

More details at https://events.iu.edu/iukctla/view/event/event_id/108635

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classroom-techtrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelTips and tricks for teaching both in-class and remote students simultaneously.classroom, zoom, document camera, KalturaThis page explains how to use technologies available in classrooms at Indiana University.How to use the classroom technology/articles/2020-summer/classroom-techIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/classroom-techmkelmer1596472603567tlmason1597754115159column_namehow_to_techshort-display-nameHow to use the classroom technologyalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-summer/classroomtechbanner1_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/classroomtechbanner1_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofclassroomtechbanner1_desktop.jpgPhoto of an instructor at the teaching computer with students participating via Zoom behind her739581800600/images/2020-summer/classroom-tech-banner1-tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/classroom-tech-banner1-tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofclassroom-tech-banner1-tablet.jpgPhoto of an instructor at the teaching computer with students participating via Zoom behind her407411200400/images/2020-summer/classroom-tech-banner1-mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/classroom-tech-banner1-mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofclassroom-tech-banner1-mobile.jpgPhoto of an instructor at the teaching computer with students participating via Zoom behind her35677768512///Right
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Tips and tricks for teaching both in-class and remote students simultaneously./Crimson
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The Learning Spaces team
h2FullOne HalfCreating a quality experience for instructors, onsite students, and online students alike.

If you'll be teaching both in-class and remote students simultaneously, or if you need a recording for students who can't attend in person, this video can help.

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FullOne Half-/Kaltura////Yeshttps://iu.mediaspace.kaltura.com/media/Using+Classroom+Technology+for+Hybrid+Instruction/1_3f1earnj-/-TopLeft///Using Classroom Technology for Hybrid InstructionStandard///YesStandard/HTML[In-person Student] Is chapter 7 going to be on... [Narrator] If you're teaching to both in-classroom and remote students simultaneously, or if you just need to record your class session, use Zoom on the classroom's desktop PC. Let's walk you through step by step. Use the lectern touch panel to power on the classroom's primary display, and show the desktop computer on it. Log into the computer and ready any supporting materials you'll want to show during class. Click the Zoom shortcut on the desktop to log into Zoom at IU. Then from your meetings list, click to join your Zoom meeting. If prompted, choose join with computer audio. Click start video to turn on your camera, and then click unmute to turn on your microphone. If your Zoom meeting isn't configured to automatically record to the cloud, Click record-to-cloud in the Zoom toolbar and look for the red recording icon. When you end your meeting, your recording will be delivered automatically to your Kaltura account. Many classrooms feature a touch capable monitor that works well with your finger or a common rubber stylus. The webcam is mounted to the lectern monitor with a flexible arm that you can move for a better angle. As you teach, remember the direction the camera is pointing, and make a point of addressing the camera as you speak. [Remote Student] I had a question about that last assignment. [Narrator] Especially when interacting with your remote students. This will help them feel more connected. Be aware of the classroom microphone. Some rooms use the webcams internal microphone, which has a limited pickup range. Other rooms, use ceiling microphones to capture a wider area. If your room has a lavalier microphone, clip it at about shoulder height for premium audio clarity. While you teach, encourage remote students to signal if you need to move closer to your microphone, or if you need to repeat questions from your in-classroom students. At discussion time, you may even find it preferable to ask for more comments from your remote participants whose own voices may come through more clearly than your in-classroom students. When you need to share your screen, click Zoom's Share Screen button. Choose your entire screen, or just a window. Select share computer audio if you'll be playing a clip with audio or a movie, then click share. When you share, Zoom moves the control tool bar to the top of your screen, but keeps your remote students cameras on screen to help you maintain eye contact. For handwritten content avoid using the chalkboard. Instead, share the classroom's document camera in zoom. First, make sure the document camera is powered on. Then in Zoom click Share Screen, then advanced, then content from second camera. Use a felt tip marker for the best contrast. When you finished teaching, click end meeting for all. And don't forget to ready the room for the next instructor by cleaning the lectern before you exit. To find out more about the technology in your assigned classroom, visit classrooms dot IU dot edu. For more about teaching strategies, visit keep teaching dot IU dot edu.
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Key recommendations from the video ensure remote participants feel more connected:

  • Start with Zoom, so you can record the classroom's computer screen, microphones, webcam, and document camera.
  • Record your class, and consider setting Zoom to automatically record to the cloud (the recording will be delivered automatically to your Kaltura account).
  • Know your microphone and where you need to stand in order to be heard — also be sure to encourage remote students to signal if they cannot hear you or the students in the classroom.
  • Know your camera, adjust it for better viewing, and make a point of addressing it as you speak.
  • Know your document camera, and use it to share hand-written or whiteboard content to help students see clearly.

For more details, visit the IU Knowledge Base: Recommendations for using technology in classrooms during fall 2020

Want to know what will be available in your classroom before you step into it? The Classroom Database provides details about the technology in your classroom as well as a support contact.

If possible, touch base with the support contact to discuss how you plan to use the classroom technology and what you can expect from them when you need help. And don't hesitate to create a cheat sheet on how to use the tech in the room, so you have a quick reference on hand.

If you need help preparing to teach — no matter whether you'll be doing so online, in person, or both — be sure to reach out to your campus teaching center. The Keep Teaching website also has a decision tree to help you find the resources and inspiration you need for this fall.

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recommended-readingtrue1627564893422tlmasonCITLFor those who want to take an independent or group approach to prepare for fall teaching.Resources for instructors who want to take an independent approach, or to work with a small group of colleagues in preparing for fall teaching.Recommended reading/articles/2020-summer/recommended-readingIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/recommended-readingmkelmer1596479828859tlmason1597754944264column_namefood_for_thoughtshort-display-nameRecommended readingalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-summer/fft_desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/fft_desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffft_desktop.pngPhoto of maw looking at his laptop in kitchen22015941800600/images/2020-summer/fft_tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/fft_tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffft_tablet.pngPhoto of maw looking at his laptop in kitchen.10566781200400/images/2020-summer/fft_mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/fft_mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffft_mobile.pngPhoto of maw looking at his laptop in kitchen797596768512///Right
Recommended Reading
For those who want to take an independent or group approach to prepare for fall teaching./Crimson
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The Centers for Teaching and Learning
h2FullOne HalfSupporting faculty in research-based teaching practices and serving as faculty advocates in conversations across IU.

Below is an excerpt from the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning's extensive support resources for fall 2020. Many thanks to them for letting us reprint it in the Connected Professor. For the full list, visit their website.

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Self-paced online resources
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IU Online Faculty Starter Kit
If you want to learn best practices and practical steps for designing and delivering online courses, the IU Online Faculty Starter Kit is for you. This free, self-paced tutorial, available through IU Expand (on Canvas), includes 17 modules designed to orient instructors to teaching online at IU. The kit is also a repository for resources on best practices for designing and delivering online courses that you can return to any time. (Note: You can probably skip over the first module, which focuses on larger administrative aspects about proposing/developing online courses at IU.)

Teaching for Student Success Course
Teaching for Student Success: An Evidence-Based Approach is an online course that provides a framework for teaching and learning grounded in empirical research. Whether you're a new instructor or have been teaching for years, teach face-to-face, hybrid, or online, these modules will help you articulate your own teaching philosophy and better serve your students, regardless of discipline. While not specifically about online education, TSS provides solid course development advice that is very applicable to online instruction. You can go through the course on your own or join a cohort facilitated by the CITL.

Quality Matters Resources
QM is a framework for guiding the development of high-quality online courses, and a review/certification process that ensures quality. Even if you don't go through the whole QM process, some of their resources provide good guidelines for creating quality online courses (and online components in blended situations):

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Books
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The following books provide excellent, concrete approaches to developing and teaching courses in both online and blended environments. They are available in electronic format from the IU Libraries' IUCAT.

The Online Teaching Survival Guide—Boettcher & Conrad (2016)
Boettcher & Conrad present a comprehensive and user-friendly guide for anyone teaching online. The book covers core principles of learning and teaching online, specific tips and strategies to teach effectively in this space, and a section on reflection and planning to increase your skill as an online instructor. In addition to these divisions, Part 2 on specific tips has four categories organized chronologically: beginning, early middle, late middle, and end. The chapter on discussion boards is particularly helpful. Read online at IUCAT

Small Teaching Online: Applying Learning Science in Online Classes—Darby (2019)
Inspired by James Lang's (2016) Small Teaching, Flower Darby provides readers with small, strategic changes that can make a significant impact on student learning in the online space. Readers will learn about applying the backward design process to online courses, how to build community within the course, and strategies for motivating students in this space. Read online at IUCAT

eService Learning: Creating Experiential Learning and Civic Engagement through Online and Hybrid Courses—Strait & Nordyke (2015)
Are you figuring out how you teach your community-engaged learning (service-learning) virtually? This book is a useful tool to help you consider what community engagement can look like when interaction may be remote. Read online at IUCAT

Flipped Learning: A Guide for Higher Education Faculty—Talbert (2017)
Talbert's seven-step process for "flipping" a classroom not only provides a simple breakdown for transitioning face-to-face content to an online format but also addresses the most significant concerns and questions that arise when teaching in partial or fully online environments. This research-based approach to organizing and implementing content guides you through making the most of an online space through considering a range of topics including cognitive load, multimedia learning, and self-regulated learning. Read online at IUCAT

The Blended Course Design Workbook: A Practical Guide—Linder (2017)
This text is a workbook designed to guide readers through creating a blended course from start to finish. Whether you have a new prep or are transitioning a face-to-face course to an online format, this workbook is your friend, particularly in this time of unknown modality for fall. Linder begins by providing definitions of course modality based on the percentage of content delivered online—blended 30-79% and online 80% or more. Read online at IUCAT

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teaching-in-the-pandemic-classroomtrue1627564893422tlmasonTracey BirdwellRedesigning your face-to-face class to work within social distancing and other pandemic guidelines.Follow the Mosaic Initiative blog to learn more about redesigning your F2F class to work within social distancing and other pandemic guidelines.Teaching in the pandemic classroom/articles/2020-summer/teaching-in-the-pandemic-classroomIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/teaching-in-the-pandemic-classroommkelmer1596491377002tlmason1597756079907column_namefeatureshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofpandemic_classroom_desktop.pngphoto of a Mosaic classroom23136721800600/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofpandemic_classroom_tablet.pngphoto of a Mosaic classroom10655781200400/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofpandemic_classroom_mobile.pngphoto of a Mosaic classroom885376768512///Left
Teaching in the pandemic classroom
Redesigning your face-to-face class to work within social distancing and other pandemic guidelines./Crimson
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Tracey Birdwell
h3FullOne HalfProgram Director, Mosaic Initiative – Indiana University

This is the second in a series of blog posts by Tracey Birdwell exploring issues surrounding what she's been thinking of as the "pandemic classroom." Her idea of the pandemic classroom is one informed by wearing masks, social distancing, fewer students, adjustments in teaching, and a potential sense of anxiety for instructors and students alike. Many thanks to Tracey for letting us reprint it here.

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Reconsidering support for fall

Since I began working for the Mosaic Initiative in 2015, I've focused on helping instructors develop and implement active learning approaches for any Indiana University classroom. In today's blog, I want to share reflective worksheets that I've used to direct and scaffold instructor thinking about the intersections of space and pedagogy in activity design. Then I want to share a revised version of those worksheets, newly amended, that I've re-envisioned to begin to address our fall 2020 circumstances.

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Previous support: analyzing your spaces for active learning

To help instructors recognize how classroom space influences their approaches to student engagement, I've used this handout (Mosaic Active Learning Activity Planner Worksheets _ July 2020) to guide instructors in 1) thinking through activity design and classroom tools analysis and 2) identifying the connections between them. My primary goal for this approach has been to help faculty figure out how to transfer activities from one classroom to another (while making small adjustments for differences in classroom features) by encouraging them to:

  • Analyze their physical classroom - Identify what tools are available and which you might use during the semester to facilitate your active learning approach.
  • Analyze their activity - Identify learning outcomes, interactions, tools required, and learning artifacts
  • Troubleshoot - Identify logistics considerations, classroom management issues, and possible workarounds
  • Adjust - Identify small adjustments to activities to be able to implement in another classroom

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Screenshot of the Mosaic Active Learning Activity Planner Worksheets - July 2020

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Re-adjusted for fall 2020

Most often used in a faculty workshop scenario, these worksheets have successfully supported instructors in past semesters. However, considering our new, highly variable, circumstances for fall 2020, I've re-conceived my previous approach. As you can see, the new worksheets look a bit different: Mosaic Teaching in the Pandemic Classroom Worksheets _ July 2020

What's different?

I've asked instructors to identify where they and their students are located. Some instructors will find themselves with students both in the classroom and online. Having students in a classroom while others are online, whether or not the instructor is in the same classroom creates significant logistical changes that require consideration.

I've asked instructors to consider what a fully online version of their activity might look like. It's reasonable to imagine that universities might have to go online again at some point during the fall. So, I've added a step in the revised activity planner that asks instructors to consider a fully digital environment for their active learning approaches.

What's the same?

The core idea remains the same: identify the ways that your learning environment, tools, and ability to interact influences how successfully you implement active learning. Identify what new circumstances and challenges you might encounter. Then make small changes to your original plans to address your unique situation for the semester.

What's next?

At the end of the fall semester, I will revise the amended worksheets for the spring. Until then, instructors can download and use these handouts to help them think about teaching this fall.

Faculty developers can use the handouts as a starting point for developing their versions for their institutions, instructors, and unique fall circumstances. For example, the Center for Teaching and Learning at IUPUI has created its version: IUPUI_CTL_Enagaging Students in a Physically Distanced Classroom—Activity Planner 2020

How about you, faculty developers? What approaches, tools, or worksheets are you using to support your faculty this fall? What adjustments are you making to your efforts to help faculty approach active learning next semester?

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canvas-kapowtrue1627564893422tlmasonZach CarnageyOne quick tip a day, working toward a more engaging Canvas course site.Learn tips over four weeks to have a Canvas course site that is more engaging and organized, easier to navigate, and more reflective of you and your subject area!Canvas kapow!/articles/2020-summer/canvas-kapowIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/canvas-kapowmkelmer1596749373328sjengel1597713289825column_namelighter_sideshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_large.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_large.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsquirrel_kapow_large.jpgSquirrel at IU's Sample Gates with a bright red KAPOW in a yellow flash1687451800600/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_medium.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_medium.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsquirrel_kapow_medium.jpgSquirrel at IU's Sample Gates with a bright red KAPOW in a yellow flash941231200400/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_small.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_small.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsquirrel_kapow_small.jpgSquirrel at IU's Sample Gates with a bright red KAPOW in a yellow flash77896768512///Right
Canvas kapow!
One quick tip a day, working toward a more engaging Canvas course site./Crimson
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A 30-day Canvas challenge
h2FullOne HalfIn four weeks you could have a Canvas course site that is more engaging and organized, easier to navigate, and more reflective of you and your subject area.

Did we mention it's a Pressbook?

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Each week is broken down into five short invitations to mold your Canvas course: You'll have one for each day of the work week, and most take only 10 or less minutes to complete. At the end of the month, you'll be on your way to a better Canvas experience for you and your students.

Here's a look at what to expect:

canvas kapow

Ready to get started? Check out the Pressbook.

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icymitrue1627564893422tlmasonvarious sourcesStay in the know about tech news and online teaching resources from around IU.Tech news from around IU.ICYMI/articles/2020-summer/icymiIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/icymimkelmer1596564081536tlmason1597754634409column_nameicymishort-display-nameICYMIalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-summer/icymi-desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/icymi-desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi-desktop.pngPhoto of woman checking her cell phone in her home office25879971800600/images/2020-summer/icymi-tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/icymi-tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi-tablet.pngPhoto of woman checking her cell phone in her home office11746531200400/images/2020-summer/icymi-mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/icymi-mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi-mobile.pngPhoto of woman checking her cell phone in her home office907259768512///Right
ICYMI
Stay in the know about tech news and online teaching resources from around IU./Crimson
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Get guidance from KeepTeaching.IU
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Teaching is different now, but we're here to support you along the way. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed our lives and how we communicate with and connect to our students.

Find practical strategies here.

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indextrue1627564893422tlmasonSummer 2020: Back to school issue of The Connected Professor.Summer 2020: Back to school/articles/2020-summer/indexIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/indextlmason1606925051692tlmason1606925051692short-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idThe Connected Professor: Fall 2019 EditionA fresh look at teaching and learning technology at IU./images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgibau_large.jpggibau_large.jpgGina Sánchez Gibau standing on the IUPUI campus.1187651800600The Connected Professor: Fall 2019 EditionA fresh look at teaching and learning technology at IU./images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2019-fall/gibau_large.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgibau_large.jpggibau_large.jpgGina Sánchez Gibau standing on the IUPUI campus.1187651800600Text Overlay/images/2020-summer/survey_says_desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/survey_says_desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsurvey_says_desktop.pngA male student and a female student walking on campus wearing masks26547981800600/images/2020-summer/survey_says_tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/survey_says_tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsurvey_says_tablet.pngA male student and a female student walking on campus wearing masks12045041200400/images/2020-summer/survey_says_mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/survey_says_mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsurvey_says_mobile.pngA male student and a female student walking on campus wearing masks985101768512///Left
Survey says: Four recommendations
Strategies, resources, and support for teaching and learning in the midst of uncertaintyRead more/articles/2020-summer/survey-sayscolumn_namefeatureshort-display-nameSurvey saysalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/survey-saysIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsurvey-saysSurvey says: Four recommendationsStrategies, resources, and support for teaching and learning in the midst of uncertaintySarah EngelDiscover actionable items and detailed strategies regarding how to implement recommendations from the IU eLearning Research and Practice Lab "Going Remote" spring 2020 survey of IU students and faculty. Light Gray
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2020-summer/rollercoastercolumn_nametaking_noteshort-display-nameThe COVID-19 rollercoasteralternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/rollercoasterIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofrollercoasterThe COVID-19 rollercoasterBehind the scenes with Director Julie Johnston and the Learning Spaces team as they prepare for the fall 2020 semester.Julie JohnstonBehind the scenes with Director Julie Johnston and the Learning Spaces team as they prepare for the fall 2020 semester.widecontent-left/images/2020-summer/leadership_desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/leadership_desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadership_desktop.pngPhoto of Learning Spaces team experiencing a virtual reality roller coaster28437051800600/images/2020-summer/leadership_tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/leadership_tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadership_tablet.pngPhoto of Learning Spaces team experiencing a virtual reality roller coaster12639971200400/images/2020-summer/leadership_mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/leadership_mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofleadership_mobile.pngPhoto of Learning Spaces team experiencing a virtual reality roller coaster1018205768512/articles/2020-summer/happeningscolumn_namehappeningsshort-display-nameHappeningsalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/happeningsIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappeningsHappeningsStay in the know about teaching and learning events at IU.Sarah EngelStay in the know about recent and upcoming teaching and learning events at IU.narrowcontent-right/images/2020-summer/happenings_desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/happenings_desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_desktop.pngPhoto of man drinking coffee during a Zoom meeting23580491800600/images/2020-summer/happenings_tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/happenings_tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_tablet.pngPhoto of man drinking coffee during a Zoom meeting10619081200400/images/2020-summer/happenings_mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/happenings_mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofhappenings_mobile.pngPhoto of man drinking coffee during a Zoom meeting839490768512/_custom-sections/2020-summer/layout2IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflayout2Text
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2020-summer/teaching-in-the-pandemic-classroomcolumn_namefeatureshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/teaching-in-the-pandemic-classroomIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofteaching-in-the-pandemic-classroomTeaching in the pandemic classroomRedesigning your face-to-face class to work within social distancing and other pandemic guidelines.Tracey BirdwellFollow the Mosaic Initiative blog to learn more about redesigning your F2F class to work within social distancing and other pandemic guidelines.fullcontent-left/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofpandemic_classroom_desktop.pngphoto of a Mosaic classroom23136721800600/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofpandemic_classroom_tablet.pngphoto of a Mosaic classroom10655781200400/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/pandemic_classroom_mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofpandemic_classroom_mobile.pngphoto of a Mosaic classroom885376768512/_custom-sections/2020-summer/layout3IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflayout3Text
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2020-summer/recommended-readingcolumn_namefood_for_thoughtshort-display-nameRecommended readingalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/recommended-readingIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofrecommended-readingRecommended readingFor those who want to take an independent or group approach to prepare for fall teaching.CITLResources for instructors who want to take an independent approach, or to work with a small group of colleagues in preparing for fall teaching.narrowcontent-left/images/2020-summer/fft_desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/fft_desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffft_desktop.pngPhoto of maw looking at his laptop in kitchen22015941800600/images/2020-summer/fft_tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/fft_tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffft_tablet.pngPhoto of maw looking at his laptop in kitchen.10566781200400/images/2020-summer/fft_mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/fft_mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproffft_mobile.pngPhoto of maw looking at his laptop in kitchen797596768512/articles/2020-summer/classroom-techcolumn_namehow_to_techshort-display-nameHow to use the classroom technologyalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/classroom-techIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofclassroom-techHow to use the classroom technologyTips and tricks for teaching both in-class and remote students simultaneously.classroom, zoom, document camera, KalturaSarah EngelThis page explains how to use technologies available in classrooms at Indiana University.widecontent-left/images/2020-summer/classroomtechbanner1_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/classroomtechbanner1_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofclassroomtechbanner1_desktop.jpgPhoto of an instructor at the teaching computer with students participating via Zoom behind her739581800600/images/2020-summer/classroom-tech-banner1-tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/classroom-tech-banner1-tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofclassroom-tech-banner1-tablet.jpgPhoto of an instructor at the teaching computer with students participating via Zoom behind her407411200400/images/2020-summer/classroom-tech-banner1-mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/classroom-tech-banner1-mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofclassroom-tech-banner1-mobile.jpgPhoto of an instructor at the teaching computer with students participating via Zoom behind her35677768512/_custom-sections/2020-summer/layout4IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflayout4Text
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site://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/_internal/velocity/custom-sections/articleArticleFeature/articles/2020-summer/canvas-kapowcolumn_namelighter_sideshort-display-namealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/canvas-kapowIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofcanvas-kapowCanvas kapow!One quick tip a day, working toward a more engaging Canvas course site.Zach CarnageyLearn tips over four weeks to have a Canvas course site that is more engaging and organized, easier to navigate, and more reflective of you and your subject area!widecontent-left/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_large.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_large.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsquirrel_kapow_large.jpgSquirrel at IU's Sample Gates with a bright red KAPOW in a yellow flash1687451800600/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_medium.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_medium.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsquirrel_kapow_medium.jpgSquirrel at IU's Sample Gates with a bright red KAPOW in a yellow flash941231200400/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_small.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/squirrel_kapow_small.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsquirrel_kapow_small.jpgSquirrel at IU's Sample Gates with a bright red KAPOW in a yellow flash77896768512/articles/2020-summer/icymicolumn_nameicymishort-display-nameICYMIalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-idsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-summer/icymiIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymiICYMIStay in the know about tech news and online teaching resources from around IU.various sourcesTech news from around IU.narrow-/images/2020-summer/icymi-desktop.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/icymi-desktop.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi-desktop.pngPhoto of woman checking her cell phone in her home office25879971800600/images/2020-summer/icymi-tablet.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/icymi-tablet.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi-tablet.pngPhoto of woman checking her cell phone in her home office11746531200400/images/2020-summer/icymi-mobile.pngsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-summer/icymi-mobile.pngIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproficymi-mobile.pngPhoto of woman checking her cell phone in her home office907259768512/_custom-sections/2020-summer/layout5IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedproflayout5Text
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2020-springtrue1609766669572tlmasonSpring 2020/articles/2020-springIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-springtlmason1583493631667tlmason1588362232421issue-titleStay Connectedshort-display-nameSpring 2020alternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonecsi-onlinetrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelGina Londino really wanted to do an online version of her forensic science lab course. She ultimately found ways to deliver the same experiments and learning outcomes as the face-to-face course.This article explores Professor Gina Londino-Smolar's experience in creating an online laboratory experience for her 100-level forensics course for non-majors. CSI: Online/articles/2020-spring/csi-onlineIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-spring/csi-onlinemkelmer1588175576355sjengel1588957946612column_namefeatureshort-display-nameCSI: Onlinealternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-spring/gina_hero_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-spring/gina_hero_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgina_hero_desktop.jpgGina Londino-Smolar inside the CIB. She's in the foreground, the background is out of focus, but it appears to be a wall of glass looking outside.747141800600/images/2020-spring/gina_hero_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-spring/gina_hero_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgina_hero_tablet.jpgGina Londino-Smolar inside the CIB. She's in the foreground, the background is out of focus, but it appears to be a wall of glass looking outside.411171200400/images/2020-spring/gina_hero_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-spring/gina_hero_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofgina_hero_mobile.jpgGina Londino-Smolar inside the CIB. She's in the foreground, the background is out of focus, but it appears to be a wall of glass looking outside.260910786512///Left
CSI: Online, forensic science for IU non-majors
Gina Londino really wanted to do an online version of her forensic science lab course. She ultimately found ways to deliver the same experiments and learning outcomes as the face-to-face course. /Crimson
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Gina Londino-Smolar
h2FullOne HalfSenior Lecturer, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Forensic and Investigative Sciences Program, IUPUI

Gina Londino's biggest advice for teaching online: Communicate the amount of time you're expecting students to spend on the material. Be very clear and upfront that you're expecting them to spend an hour watching a video, and another hour reading material and answering questions. This is very helpful for students, so they can manage their time effectively and know what they should be working on.

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As Londino notes, a 100-level class for non-science majors should be basic and fun—students should be learning something new, without the stress of figuring out how to make the timing work. Many of these lab classes are just shy of three hours long and meet once a week, which can lead to scheduling conflicts. Having an asynchronous, online version means students can pick up a two-credit class for the general education requirement, and complete the work whenever it fits with their schedules.

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I really wanted to do an online version of my forensic science lab course. The biggest thing about it was I wanted to have the same experiments and learning outcomes as the face-to-face course. It's not a new class; it's just a different version of the same class.

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With that in mind, Londino's online forensics course is set up as a series of modules. Students start with the basics of how forensic science defines evidence (e.g., different kinds of crime scene evidence). They move on to impression evidence like fingerprints, tracks, and footwear. Then comes biological, chemistry-related, and trace evidence. Everything sits in Canvas, so they can work through recordings and course content at their own pace.

Students complete both virtual and hands-on experiments as part of each module. Some are physical labs they do using kits at home, some are experiments Londino records herself doing for students to comment on, and others revolve around virtual walk-throughs or images they evaluate. With the help of Instructional Technologist Maggie Ricci, she took 360-degree pictures of the Indiana State Police Crime Lab and Department of Toxicology Lab, which she used along with still pictures (close-ups of instrumentation) to develop tours in Google Tour Creator. Londino even went so far as taking the 360-degree camera home to capture a fictitious crime scene in her family room.

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Embedded Quick Checks and H5P activities encourage students to engage with course materials like the tours, asking them to consider different scenarios and determine the best methods to use in each one. Londino says Quick Check is one of her favorite tools in Canvas. She uses quick checks a lot because they get students to read the material or watch the videos she posts, and then answer questions right there. She can be sure they're doing the work, and they can review as often as needed. H5P, a way to create and share HTML5 content, adds interactive elements that draw students' attention, and highlight key concepts.

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In the face-to-face version of the course, students often work in groups or in pairs. In the online version, Londino relies on Canvas discussions for social interaction. For example, she'll post a news clip about 23 and Me genetic testing being used to solve crimes, then ask students to share their opinions about whether it should be used that way. She also plans to add Canvas chat or another discussion forum for questions, as a way of encouraging and sharing those kinds of exchanges.

Reflecting on her first experience teaching a lab course online, Londino has a few pieces of advice for those who are new to teaching online (and particularly those who want to include a lab):

  • If you have to move online quickly, start by creating some recordings and identifying freely-available virtual resources (e.g., free web content). You can always add hands-on activities later. At the outset, focus on good communication, be flexible, and encourage students to reach out if they need help.
  • When using something like a lab kit, make sure you and your students get the same kit, so you all have the same materials (and you can record demos). Also, take advantage of the supporting materials that come with the kit—eScience Labs, the company Londino uses, has a lot of content that they're willing to let you repurpose if you give appropriate credit.
  • If you have time for extended planning, use regular teaching center consultations to stay on track and determine the best course design. The consultants know the right questions to get you thinking about what's possible and how to achieve it. Don't hesitate to call and ask for help.

Londino is finding that her online approaches make sense face-to-face too. Accessibility, in the broadest sense, is key. Some students may need alternative formats like tactile versions of evidence that tends to be visual. Many students struggle with text-heavy manuals and get more out of video explanations. And most students prefer to have everything at hand in a digital format like an eText or Pressbook. Ultimately, teaching online brings out issues that are less pronounced in person, so thinking through accessibility for online teaching can actually make face-to-face classes better and fairer, too. 

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three-accessibility-tipstrue1627564893422tlmasonBrian RichwineSimple ways you can increase engagement and satisfaction for all students through accessible course materials.Article featuring Brian Richwine's tips for simple ways you can increase engagement and satisfaction for all students by providing accessible, universally designed materials. Three accessibility tips for all learners/articles/2020-spring/three-accessibility-tipsIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-spring/three-accessibility-tipsmkelmer1588179620282mkelmer1588695246431column_nametaking_noteshort-display-namesimple tips for material designalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-spring/richwine_desktop.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-spring/richwine_desktop.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofrichwine_desktop.jpgBrian Richwine on stage at the Accessible by Design conference in 2018.1271571800600/images/2020-spring/richwine_tablet.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-spring/richwine_tablet.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofrichwine_tablet.jpgBrian Richwine on stage at the Accessible by Design conference in 2018.587291200400/images/2020-spring/richwine_mobile.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-spring/richwine_mobile.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofrichwine_mobile.jpgBrian Richwine on stage at the Accessible by Design conference in 2018.46574768512///Right
Three accessibility tips that improve engagement for all learners
The accessibility of learning materials is often a topic reserved for serving students with disabilities. But there are simple ways you can increase engagement and satisfaction for all students./Crimson
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Brian Richwine
h2FullOne HalfSenior Accessibility Strategist, Learning Technologies

The accessibility of learning materials is often a topic reserved for serving students with disabilities. But there are simple ways you can increase engagement and satisfaction for all students by providing accessible, universally designed materials. Here are Brian Richwine's top tips:

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1. Supply alternatives to PDFs
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A PDF’s fixed-layout means the reader often must choose between the unappealing experience of either a view that is too small to read comfortably or the experience of repeatedly adjusting the zoom and scrolling side-to-side.

When students have more choices for how they can consume instructional content, they also gain more flexibility in settings for studying. Consider how the PDFs appear when viewed on a smartphone.

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An alternative to PDFs
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When supplying a PDF, consider providing the content in a more flexible format like a web page or Canvas module, or as well. Just adding a link to an article’s original web page along with the PDF can provide a better experience—many journals offer multiple formats, including a responsive web view.

Here is how the same paper looks to smartphone users on the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s website. The included table of contents provides a quick overview of the content and navigation of the document.

Other formats that work well on mobile devices include Pressbooks, IU Blogs, and content authored in Canvas (see How can I use Canvas on my mobile device as a student?).

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Hundreds of studies explore how Video Captions Benefit Everyone (Gernsbacher 2015)  – by increasing students’ attention, comprehension, and retention of information delivered in video lectures.

Do you use Kaltura to have your course videos captioned? If so, consider providing a link to the videos in Kaltura MediaSpace. The video player inside of Kaltura’s MediaSpace includes the Kaltura Interactive Transcription Widget, which lets students view and search a video’s text transcript, quickly navigating to any desired subject in your videos. Student engagement with your online videos will increase once they learn how easy it is to find and review particular topics.

You can also create a channel inside of MediaSpace to make it easier for students to find all of a course’s video content.

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3. Invest an hour in learning more
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Hopefully, the above ideas have piqued your interest in how universally designed course materials can boost student engagement and satisfaction in your courses. The best part is that you neither have to be an accessibility expert, nor spend days making significant changes. 

And it is not just the students that will benefit. The techniques for creating documents with accessibility in mind can save document authors time too. Here are a few resources that can show you how to make a difference with as little as one hour of investment:

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DIY self-paced accessibility courses
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  • Creating an Accessible Syllabus using Microsoft Word (1 hour)
    Available in Expand, this course describes the importance of an accessible syllabus. It will quickly teach you how to create a well-structured document using headings, outlines, and lists; how to add alternative text to images; how to write effective, descriptive text for links; and how to check a finished document to ensure it is accessible.
  • Improving the Accessibility of Your Canvas Course (4 hours)
    Are you wondering what areas to consider when it comes to Canvas accessibility? This newly developed course describes the steps to consider and how to evaluate if a Canvas site is accessible. Learn accessibility techniques for content in Canvas, commonly uploaded resource types like video, and publisher courseware products. Also, learn how to use the UDOIT tool to check an entire Canvas course for accessibility.
  • Higher Education Accessibility Kit (various hour-long courses)
    Deque is offering six-month free access to their document accessibility courses. Learn the fundamentals behind what makes documents accessible and specific techniques for:
    • MS Word Accessibility
    • MS Excel Accessibility
    • InDesign Accessibility
    • PDF Accessibility Basic
    • PDF Accessibility Advanced
    • EPUB Accessibility
  • Implementing UDL on Canvas (1 hour/week, 4 weeks)
    Deepen your understanding of accessibility and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Explore how the UDL framework can guide the design of engaging, effective, and accessible courses using features in the Canvas LMS. 
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Books on UDL
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Are you worried about a performance gap between online and face-to-face classroom learning? Looking for ways to engage and motivate online learners, while minimizing the effect situational and personal barriers have on their success? The following books discuss how to use the UDL framework and guidelines to support student persistence, satisfaction, and retention in online courses:

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Video
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Prefer to watch a video? Watch Thomas Tobin speak at the University of West Georgia on UDL as a Secret Retention Tool (6 video segments, 10-15 minutes each).

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happeningstrue1627564893422tlmasonSarah EngelFinding ways to stay connected online.Learn more about upcoming events in teaching and learning at IUSpring 2020 events/articles/2020-spring/happeningsIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/articles/2020-spring/happeningsmkelmer1588195737618sjengel1588780085208column_namehappeningsshort-display-namehappeningsalternate-link-labelnavigation-setNonewide-pageYesbody-classbody-id//Text Overlay/images/2020-spring/noma_chickens.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-spring/noma_chickens.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofnoma_chickens.jpgNoma Maier's chickens, shown here, frequently feature in DEPI team meetings.4250431800600/images/2020-spring/noma_chickens2.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-spring/noma_chickens2.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofnoma_chickens2.jpgNoma Maier's chickens, shown here, frequently feature in DEPI team meetings.2010511200400/images/2020-spring/noma_chickens3.jpgsite://IU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprof/images/2020-spring/noma_chickens3.jpgIU-UITS-DEPI.connectedprofnoma_chickens3.jpgNoma Maier's chickens, shown here, frequently feature in DEPI team meetings.148191768512///Right
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Stay in the know about upcoming events
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Want to keep up with IU-wide events focused on teaching and learning with technology?

Subscribe to the LT list

LT list messages include featured learning technologies and pilots, news and updates on various apps and tools, and upcoming events and opportunities.

Keep an eye on Teaching.IU

Teaching.IU connects instructors to university-wide resources and communities of educators across IU. The site gathers and curates a wide range of teaching resources, available to all instructors.

Check-in with your campus teaching and learning center

The centers provide consultations on IU pedagogical and instructional technologies. They're also the best-connected when it comes to knowing what's going on across campus.

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In this issue
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Getting Started with IT Training
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This webinar series will give you quick introductions to the online courses available at no cost through IU Expand. In 30 minutes or less, you'll get examples of what to expect from a course and learn how to enroll.

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  • May 7: Getting started with Google Docs
  • May 12: Getting started with Zoom - participant edition
  • May 14: Getting started with Zoom - hosting edition
  • May 19: Getting started with creating digital research posters
  • May 21: Getting started with Google Slides

Explore courses and register online.

Access recordings of previous webinars.

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The affordances and constraints of using Zoom in teaching
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Faculty members John Arthos, Vivian Halloran, Shabnam Kavousian, Erika Lee and Kalani Craig will share how they are using Zoom, both synchronously and asynchronously, in their teaching.

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Panelists will share how they

  • decided when and when not to use Zoom to support course progress
  • managed the transition of moving online, including how they adjusted to feelings of alienation from their students
  • moved active learning activities to online spaces
  • helped students become more self-directed learners

Panelists will discuss their strategies in the first part of the session. The rest of the time will be devoted to answering questions from the audience. Audience members will also be encouraged to share their strategies as well. 

Register online to participate in the discussion.

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Using Kaltura Quizzes to increase student engagement with recorded lectures
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In this Teaching with Technology Showcase, you'll learn how Jacob Farmer changed his traditional lecture sessions into more digestible chunks for his students using short, engaging videos and Kaltura quizzing. 

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Join this webinar to: 

  • Learn how you can use Kaltura quizzes to enhance your recorded lectures and gain insight into student engagement that may otherwise be difficult.
  • Discover how you can create an efficient workflow, showing the whole process from creating a lecture capture through creating modules and assignments in Canvas.
  • Hear about missteps and lessons learned from a reluctant online lecturer.

Jointly planned and sponsored by the teaching and learning centers across all Indiana University campuses, the Teaching with Technology Faculty Showcase webinar series is designed to inform and inspire. Each session features IU faculty who are using technology to increase student engagement and improve learning outcomes. During the first 20-30 minutes of these one-hour sessions, the presenter(s) will describe and illustrate how they use specific technologies to achieve instructional goals. The remaining time will be used for more in-depth exploration of the featured technologies. Instructors of all ranks from all IU campuses are welcome to participate in Teaching with Technology Faculty Showcase (TTFS) webinars.  

RSVP for this webinar online.

 

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